Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/20191
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Systematic biases in early ERP and ERF components as a result of high-pass filtering
Authors: Acunzo, David
MacKenzie, Graham
van, Rossum Mark C W
Contact Email: graham.mackenzie@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: ERP
ERF
High-pass filtering
Data processing
C1
Issue Date: Jul-2012
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Acunzo D, MacKenzie G & van Rossum MCW (2012) Systematic biases in early ERP and ERF components as a result of high-pass filtering, Journal of Neuroscience Methods, 209 (1), pp. 212-218.
Abstract: The event-related potential (ERP) and event-related field (ERF) techniques provide valuable insights into the time course of processes in the brain. Because neural signals are typically weak, researchers commonly filter the data to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. However, filtering may distort the data, leading to false results. Using our own EEG data, we show that acausal high-pass filtering can generate a systematic bias easily leading to misinterpretations of neural activity. In particular, we show that the early ERP component C1 is very sensitive to such effects. Moreover, we found that about half of the papers reporting modulations in the C1 range used a high-pass digital filter cut-off above the recommended maximum of 0.1 Hz. More generally, among 185 relevant ERP/ERF publications, 80 used cutoffs above 0.1 Hz. As a consequence, part of the ERP/ERF literature may need to be re-analyzed. We provide guidelines on how to minimize filtering artifacts.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/20191
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneumeth.2012.06.011
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Edinburgh
Psychology
University of Edinburgh

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Acunzo MacKenzie & van Rossum 2012.pdf926.92 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 31/12/2999     Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependant on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.

This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.