Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/19886
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Field realistic doses of pesticide imidacloprid reduce bumblebee pollen foraging efficiency
Authors: Feltham, Hannah
Park, Kirsty
Goulson, Dave
Contact Email: k.j.park@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Bombus
Neonicotinoid
RFID technology
Pollen collection
Issue Date: Apr-2014
Publisher: Springer
Citation: Feltham H, Park K & Goulson D (2014) Field realistic doses of pesticide imidacloprid reduce bumblebee pollen foraging efficiency, Ecotoxicology, 23 (3), pp. 317-323.
Abstract: Bumblebees and other pollinators provide a vital ecosystem service for the agricultural sector. Recent studies however have suggested that exposure to systemic neonicotinoid insecticides in flowering crops has sub-lethal effects on the bumblebee workforce, and hence in reducing queen production. The mechanism behind reduced nest performance, however, remains unclear. Here we use Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology to test whether exposure to a low, field realistic dose (0.7 ppb in sugar water and 6 ppb in pollen) of the neonicotinoid imidacloprid, reduces worker foraging efficiency. Whilst the nectar foraging efficiency of bees treated with imidacloprid was not significantly different than that of control bees, treated bees brought back pollen less often than control bees (40 % of trips vs 63 % trips, respectively) and, where pollen was collected, treated bees brought back 31 % less pollen per hour than controls. This study demonstrates that field-realistic doses of these pesticides substantially impacts on foraging ability of bumblebee workers when collecting pollen, and we suggest that this provides a causal mechanism behind reduced queen production in imidacloprid exposed colonies.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/19886
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10646-014-1189-7
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Publisher policy allows this work to be made available in this repository; The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Affiliation: University of Stirling
Biological and Environmental Sciences
University of Sussex



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