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Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Roadless wilderness area determines forest elephant movements in the Congo Basin
Authors: Blake, Stephen
Deem, Sharon Lynn
Strindberg, Samantha
Maisels, Fiona
Momont, Ludovic
Inogwabini, Bila-Isia
Douglas-Hamilton, Iain
Karesh, William B
Kock, Michael D
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Issue Date: Oct-2008
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: Blake S, Deem SL, Strindberg S, Maisels F, Momont L, Inogwabini B, Douglas-Hamilton I, Karesh WB & Kock MD (2008) Roadless wilderness area determines forest elephant movements in the Congo Basin, PLoS ONE, 3 (10), Art. No.: e3546.
Abstract: A dramatic expansion of road building is underway in the Congo Basin fuelled by private enterprise, international aid, and government aspirations. Among the great wilderness areas on earth, the Congo Basin is outstanding for its high biodiversity, particularly mobile megafauna including forest elephants (Loxodonta africana cyclotis). The abundance of many mammal species in the Basin increases with distance from roads due to hunting pressure, but the impacts of road proliferation on the movements of individuals are unknown. We investigated the ranging behaviour of forest elephants in relation to roads and roadless wilderness by fitting GPS telemetry collars onto a sample of 28 forest elephants living in six priority conservation areas. We show that the size of roadless wilderness is a strong determinant of home range size in this species. Though our study sites included the largest wilderness areas in central African forests, none of 4 home range metrics we calculated, including core area, tended toward an asymptote with increasing wilderness size, suggesting that uninhibited ranging in forest elephants no longer exists. Furthermore we show that roads outside protected areas which are not protected from hunting are a formidable barrier to movement while roads inside protected areas are not. Only 1 elephant from our sample crossed an unprotected road. During crossings her mean speed increased 14-fold compared to normal movements. Forest elephants are increasingly confined and constrained by roads across the Congo Basin which is reducing effective habitat availability and isolating populations, significantly threatening long term conservation efforts. If the current road development trajectory continues, forest wildernesses and the forest elephants they contain will collapse.
Type: Journal Article
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Rights: © 2008 Blake et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Affiliation: Wildlife Conservation Society (North America Program)
Wildlife Conservation Society (North America Program)
Wildlife Conservation Society (North America Program)
Wildlife Conservation Society (Africa Program)
The National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS)
Wildlife Conservation Society (Africa Program)
Save The Elephants
Wildlife Conservation Society (North America Program)
Wildlife Conservation Society (North America Program)

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