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Appears in Collections:Law and Philosophy Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Neo-Aristotelian Social Justice: An Unanswered Question
Authors: Hope, Simon
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Keywords: Aristotle
Social justice
Ethical naturalism
Issue Date: 1-May-2013
Publisher: Springer
Citation: Hope S (2013) Neo-Aristotelian Social Justice: An Unanswered Question, Res Publica, 19 (2), pp. 157-172.
Abstract: In this paper I assess the possibility of advancing a modern conception of social justice under neo-Aristotelian lights, focussing primarily on conceptions that assert a fundamental connection between social justice and eudaimonia. After some preliminary remarks on the extent to which a neo-Aristotelian account must stay close to Aristotle's own, I focus on Martha Nussbaum's sophisticated neo-Aristotelian approach, which I argue implausibly overworks the aspects of Aristotle's thought it appeals to. I then outline the shape of a deeper and more general, and as yet unanswered, problem facing neo-Aristotelian accounts: how to justify the claim that the point of a just society is to assist or enable its members to flourish.
Type: Journal Article
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Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Philosophy

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