Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/19322
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Potential effects of prescribed savannah burning on the diet selection of forest buffalo (Syncerus caffer nanus) in Lopé National Park, Gabon
Authors: van, der Hoek Yntze
Lustenhouwer, Ivo
Jeffery, Kathryn Jane
van, Hooft Pim
Contact Email: kathryn.jeffery1@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: buffalo
diet
faecal analysis
fire
Gabon
savannah
Issue Date: Mar-2013
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Citation: van der Hoek Y, Lustenhouwer I, Jeffery KJ & van Hooft P (2013) Potential effects of prescribed savannah burning on the diet selection of forest buffalo (Syncerus caffer nanus) in Lopé National Park, Gabon, African Journal of Ecology, 51 (1), pp. 94-101.
Abstract: Seasonality and management are factors that may affect the diet selection of the forest buffalo (Syncerus caffer nanus). Fire is considered a major driving force in savannah systems and prescribed burning is a commonly applied conservation tool in protected areas such as Lopé National Park, Gabon. Prescribed annual fires contribute to the maintenance of open areas and provide high-quality forage for forest buffalo, a major herbivore in the park. We used microhistological faecal analysis to determine the diet selection of forest buffalo and measured the extent of variation between a dry season, preburn and a wet season, postburn sampling period. The buffalo diet comprised mainly of monocotyledons, primarily grasses (Poaceae) and sedges (Cyperaceae). Intake of open-area-associated plant species was higher in the wet season, postburn treatment sampling period (97%) than the dry season, preburn sampling period (87%), which corresponded conversely to a reduction in forest-associated Marantaceae plants (10% versus 1%). High proportions of grasses and sedges in the diet signify the importance of open areas for forest buffalo. Controlled burning as tool for maintenance of open areas may play a key role in the meta-population management of the forest buffalo.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/19322
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aje.12010
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Wageningen University
Wageningen University
Biological and Environmental Sciences
Wageningen University

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Vanderhoeketal_2012_AJE.pdf236.14 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 31/12/2999     Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependant on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.

This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.