Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/18716
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Maternal feeding behaviour and young children's dietary quality: A cross-sectional study of socially disadvantaged mothers of two-year old children using the Theory of Planned Behaviour
Authors: Swanson, Vivien
Power, Kevin George
Crombie, Iain K
Irvine, Linda
Kiezebrink, Kirsty
Wrieden, Wendy
Slane, Peter W
Contact Email: vivien.swanson@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Jun-2011
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd
Citation: Swanson V, Power KG, Crombie IK, Irvine L, Kiezebrink K, Wrieden W & Slane PW (2011) Maternal feeding behaviour and young children's dietary quality: A cross-sectional study of socially disadvantaged mothers of two-year old children using the Theory of Planned Behaviour, International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 8, Art. No.: 65.
Abstract: Background: Having breakfast, eating food 'cooked from scratch' and eating together as a family have health and psychosocial benefits for young children. This study investigates how these parentally determined behaviours relate to children's dietary quality and uses a psychological model, the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), to investigate socio-cognitive predictors of these behaviours in socially disadvantaged mothers of young children in Scotland. Method: Three hundred mothers of children aged 2 years (from 372 invited to participate, 81% response rate), recruited via General Practitioners, took part in home-based semi-structured interviews in a cross-sectional survey of maternal psychological factors related to their children's dietary quality. Regression analyses examined statistical predictors of maternal intentions and feeding behaviours. Results: Mothers of children with poorer quality diets were less likely than others to provide breakfast every day, cook from 'scratch' and provide 'proper sit-down meals'. TPB socio-cognitive factors (intentions, perceived behavioural control) significantly predicted these three behaviours, and attitudes, norms, and perceived behavioural control significantly predicted mothers' intentions, with medium to large effect sizes. Conclusions: Interventions to improve young children's dietary health could benefit from a focus on modifying maternal motivations and attitudes in attempts to improve feeding behaviours.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/18716
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1479-5868-8-65
Rights: © 2011 Swanson et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Affiliation: Psychology
Psychology
University of Dundee
University of Dundee
University of Aberdeen
Robert Gordon University
Erskine Practice

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