Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/18217
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Increased mortality in parents bereaved in the first year of their child's life
Authors: Harper, Mairi
O'Connor, Rory
O'Carroll, Ronan
Contact Email: ronan.ocarroll@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Dec-2011
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
Citation: Harper M, O'Connor R & O'Carroll R (2011) Increased mortality in parents bereaved in the first year of their child's life, BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care, 1 (3), pp. 306-309.
Abstract: Objective: To identify the relative risk (RR) of mortality in bereaved parents compared with non-bereaved counterparts. Design: Retrospective data linkage study. Setting: United Kingdom, 1971-2006. Participants: A random sample from death registrations (5%) of parents who had a live birth where the infant lived beyond its first year of life (non-bereaved parents) and parents who had experienced a stillbirth or the death of a child in its first year of life (bereaved parents) between 1971 and 2006. Main outcome measures: Death or widowhood of the parent. Results: Bereaved parents in Scotland (n=738) were more than twice as likely to die in the first 15 years after their child's death than non-bereaved parents (n=50 132), p<0.005. Bereaved mothers in England and Wales (n=481) were more than four times as likely to die in the first 15 years after their child's birth than non-bereaved parents (n=30 956), p<0.001. The mortality risk for bereaved mothers compared with non-bereaved mothers, followed up for 25 years after death, was 1.5 (bereaved n=745, non-bereaved n=36 434), p<0.005. When followed up for 35 years, the risk of mortality for bereaved mothers (n=1120) was 1.2 times that of non-bereaved mothers (n=36 062), p<0.005. Conclusions: Bereaved parents who experience stillbirth or infant death have markedly increased mortality compared with non-bereaved parents, up to 25 years (mean) after the death of their child. However, the RR reduces over time.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/18217
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2011-000025
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: HS UG Regulated - Stirling
Psychology
Psychology

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