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Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Facial cues of dominance modulate the short-term gaze-cuing effect in human observers
Authors: Jones, Benedict C
DeBruine, Lisa M
Main, Julie C
Little, Anthony
Welling, Lisa L M
Feinberg, David R
Tiddeman, Bernard P
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Keywords: gaze
joint attention
Issue Date: Feb-2010
Publisher: The Royal Society
Citation: Jones BC, DeBruine LM, Main JC, Little A, Welling LLM, Feinberg DR & Tiddeman BP (2010) Facial cues of dominance modulate the short-term gaze-cuing effect in human observers, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 277 (1681), pp. 617-624.
Abstract: Responding appropriately to gaze cues is essential for fluent social interaction, playing a crucial role in social learning, collaboration, threat assessment and understanding others' intentions. Previous research has shown that responses to gaze cues can be studied by investigating the gaze-cuing effect (i.e. the tendency for observers to respond more quickly to targets in locations that were cued by others' gaze than to uncued targets). A recent study demonstrating that macaques demonstrate larger gaze-cuing effects when viewing dominant conspecifics than when viewing subordinate conspecifics suggests that cues of dominance modulate the gaze-cuing effect in at least one primate species. Here, we show a similar effect of facial cues associated with dominance on gaze cuing in human observers: at short viewing times, observers demonstrated a greater cuing effect for gaze cues from masculinized (i.e. dominant) faces than from feminized (i.e. subordinate) faces. Moreover, this effect of facial masculinity on gaze cuing decreased as viewing time was increased, suggesting that the effect is driven by involuntary responses. Our findings suggest that the mechanisms that underpin reflexive gaze cuing evolved to be sensitive to facial cues of others' dominance, potentially because such differential gaze cuing promoted desirable outcomes from encounters with dominant individuals.
Type: Journal Article
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Rights: This article is open-access. Open access publishing allows free access to and distribution of published articles where the author retains copyright of their work by employing a Creative Commons attribution licence. Proper attribution of authorship and correct citation details should be given.
Affiliation: University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
McMaster University
University of St Andrews

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