Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/17854
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Sexual dimorphism of male face shape, partnership status and the temporal context of relationship sought modulate women's preferences for direct gaze
Authors: Conway, Claire A
Jones, Benedict C
DeBruine, Lisa M
Little, Anthony
Contact Email: anthony.little@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Feb-2010
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Citation: Conway CA, Jones BC, DeBruine LM & Little A (2010) Sexual dimorphism of male face shape, partnership status and the temporal context of relationship sought modulate women's preferences for direct gaze, British Journal of Psychology, 101 (1), pp. 109-121.
Abstract: Most previous studies of face preferences have investigated the physical cues that influence face preferences. Far fewer studies have investigated the effects of cues to the direction of others' social interest (i.e. gaze direction) on face preferences. Here we found that unpartnered women demonstrated stronger preferences for direct gaze (indicating social interest) from feminine male faces than from masculine male faces when judging men's attractiveness for long-term relationships, but not when judging men's attractiveness for short-term relationships. Moreover, unpartnered women's preferences for direct gaze from feminine men were stronger for long-term than short-term relationships, but there was no comparable effect for judgements of masculine men. No such effects were evident among women with romantic partners, potentially reflecting different motivations underlying partnered and unpartnered women's judgements of men's attractiveness. Collectively these findings (1) complement previous findings whereby women demonstrated stronger preferences for feminine men as long-term than short-term partners, (2) demonstrate context-sensitivity in the integration of physical and social cues in face preferences, and (3) suggest that gaze preferences may function, at least in part, to facilitate efficient allocation of mating effort.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/17854
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1348/000712609X436435
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
Psychology

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