Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/17723
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Women's self-perceived health and attractiveness predict their male vocal masculinity preferences in different directions across short- and long-term relationship contexts
Authors: Feinberg, David R
DeBruine, Lisa M
Jones, Benedict C
Little, Anthony
O'Connor, Jillian J M
Tigue, Cara C
Contact Email: anthony.little@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Attractiveness
Voice
Face
Condition
Individual difference
Mate choice
Issue Date: Mar-2012
Publisher: Springer
Citation: Feinberg DR, DeBruine LM, Jones BC, Little A, O'Connor JJM & Tigue CC (2012) Women's self-perceived health and attractiveness predict their male vocal masculinity preferences in different directions across short- and long-term relationship contexts, Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 66 (3), pp. 413-418.
Abstract: Research has revealed that women's self-perceived attractiveness positively predicts preferences for male facial and vocal masculinity, particularly in the context of long-term relationships. Other research has demonstrated that women who perceive themselves to be less healthy prefer male masculinity more than do women who may be healthier. As self-perceived health may predict self-perceived attractiveness, previous findings may appear to be contradictory. Therefore, we compared the effects of self-perceived attractiveness and self-perceived health on vocal masculinity preferences in long- and short-term relationship contexts. We found that although self-perceived health and attractiveness were positively correlated, self-rated attractiveness positively predicted long-term vocal masculinity preferences, whereas self-rated health negatively predicted short-term vocal masculinity preferences. While health and attractiveness may share a common basis, here we show independent potentially adaptive relationships with preferences based on relationship context. Such preferences are potentially adaptive as (a) masculine men may pass on inheritable immunity to infection to their offspring, which may be a relatively greater benefit for women in poor health; and (b) masculine men may be more likely to invest in relationships and offspring of relatively attractive women, decreasing the cost of choosing a masculine long-term partner for attractive women. These data resolve a potential conflict between health and attractiveness influences on the attractiveness of masculinity and highlight sophisticated individual differences in preferences.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/17723
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-011-1287-y
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: McMaster University
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
Psychology
McMaster University
McMaster University

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