Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/17698
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Environment contingent preferences: Exposure to visual cues of direct male–male competition and wealth increase women's preferences for masculinity in male faces
Authors: Little, Anthony
DeBruine, Lisa M
Jones, Benedict C
Contact Email: anthony.little@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Sexual dimorphism
Attractiveness
Competition
Intra-sexual
Violence
Wealth
Issue Date: May-2013
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Little A, DeBruine LM & Jones BC (2013) Environment contingent preferences: Exposure to visual cues of direct male–male competition and wealth increase women's preferences for masculinity in male faces, Evolution and Human Behavior, 34 (3), pp. 193-200.
Abstract: Previous studies show that parasite prevalence and mortality/health are related to cultural variation in women's preferences for attractive and masculine traits in men. Other studies have suggested that both male-male competition and wealth may also be important correlates of cross-cultural variation in women's masculinity preferences. Here we examined whether exposure to cues of direct male-male competition, violence, or wealth influenced women's face preferences. We showed women slideshows of images with cues of low and high direct male-male competition/violence or wealth and measured their visual preferences for masculine face traits. Recent visual experience changed women's preferences for facial masculinity, with women preferring more masculine male faces after exposure to images of men engaged in direct physical competition, images of weapons, or images depicting items of high monetary value. Recent visual experience had no significant effects on preferences for masculinity in same-sex faces. Given that high levels of direct physical competition and violence among males may increase the importance of direct intra-sexual competition, it may be adaptive for women to shift visual preferences in favor of males with face cues indicating physical strength and dominance over investment in such environments. Similarly, in wealthy environments investment may be less important than other aspects of quality and so it may be adaptive for women to shift visual preferences in favor of males with face cues indicating other aspects of quality over investment. Overall, our data demonstrate that preferences can be strategically flexible according to recent visual experience and support the notion of environment contingent preferences.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/17698
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2012.11.008
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Psychology
University of Glasgow
University of Glasgow

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