Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/1636
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Researching experiences of terminal cancer: a systematic review of methodological issues and approaches
Authors: Harris, Fiona Margaret
Kendall, Marilyn
Bentley, A
Maguire, Roma
Worth, Alison
Murray, Scott A
Boyd, Kirsty
Brown, Duncan
Kearney, Nora
Sheikh, Aziz
Contact Email: fiona.harris@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: cancer
patient experience
research methods
systematic review
Issue Date: Jul-2008
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Citation: Harris FM, Kendall M, Bentley A, Maguire R, Worth A, Murray SA, Boyd K, Brown D, Kearney N & Sheikh A (2008) Researching experiences of terminal cancer: a systematic review of methodological issues and approaches, European Journal of Cancer Care, 17 (4), pp. 377-386.
Abstract: The objectives of this review were to assess the methods and approaches applied to end-of-life cancer research based on papers focusing on approaches or methodological issues related to seeking the views of people affected by terminal cancer. A comprehensive search of 10 databases (January 1980–February 2004) was undertaken. References were screened, quality assessed and data extracted by two reviewers. Analysis followed a meta-narrative approach. Fifteen papers were included. They discussed ‘traditional’ approaches, such as focus groups, interviews, surveys, as well as innovative approaches allied to the arts. They reveal that mixed methods are gaining popularity. The emotional demands placed on researchers and the ethical issues involved in this research area were also discussed. We concluded that researchers should embrace innovative approaches from other areas of social science, such as the use of arts-based techniques. This may facilitate recruitment of the hard-to-reach groups and engage with experiences that may be otherwise difficult to verbalize. Although researching the needs of the dying carries challenges, these are not the exclusive domain of the cancer field. This study reveals that diverse methods, from research-based drama to postal questionnaires, can enhance end-of-life research. However, this review reveals the need for more methodological work to be undertaken and disseminated.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/1636
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2354.2007.00880.x
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author; you can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: NMAHP Research
University of Edinburgh
Strathcarron Hospice
Cancer Care Research Centre
University of Stirling
University of Edinburgh
University of Edinburgh
St Columba's Hospice
HS Research - Stirling
University of Edinburgh

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