Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/15694
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Understanding scales of movement: Animals ride waves and ripples of environmental change
Authors: van, Moorter Bram
Bunnefeld, Nils
Panzacchi, Manuela
Rolandsen, Christer M
Solberg, Erling Johan
Saether, Bernt-Erik
Contact Email: nils.bunnefeld@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Alces alces
foraging
Fourier transform
GPS
migration
NDVI
phenology
resource
spatiotemporal scales
snow
Issue Date: Jul-2013
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell for British Ecological Society
Citation: van Moorter B, Bunnefeld N, Panzacchi M, Rolandsen CM, Solberg EJ & Saether B (2013) Understanding scales of movement: Animals ride waves and ripples of environmental change, Journal of Animal Ecology, 82 (4), pp. 770-780.
Abstract: 1. Animal movements are the primary behavioural adaptation to spatiotemporal heterogeneity in resource availability. Depending on their spatiotemporal scale, movements have been categorized into distinct functional groups (e.g. foraging movements, dispersal, migration), and have been studied using different methodologies. We suggest striving towards the development of a coherent framework based on the ultimate function of all movement types, which is to increase individual fitness through an optimal exploitation of resources varying in space and time. 2. We developed a novel approach to simultaneously study movements at different spatiotemporal scales based on the following proposed theory: the length and frequency of animal movements are determined by the interaction between temporal autocorrelation in resource availability and spatial autocorrelation in changes in resource availability. We hypothesized that for each time interval the spatiotemporal scales of moose Alces alces movements correspond to the spatiotemporal scales of variation in the gains derived from resource exploitation when taking into account the costs of movements (represented by their proxies, forage availability NDVI and snow depth respectively). The scales of change in NDVI and snow were quantified using wave theory, and were related to the scale of moose movement using linear mixed models. 3. In support of the proposed theory we found that frequent, smaller scale movements were triggered by fast, small-scale ripples of changes, whereas infrequent, larger scale movements matched slow, large-scale waves of change in resource availability. Similarly, moose inhabiting ranges characterized by larger scale waves of change in the onset of spring migrated longer distances. 4. We showed that the scales of movements are driven by the scales of changes in the net profitability of trophic resources. Our approach can be extended to include drivers of movements other than trophic resources (e.g. population density, density of related individuals, predation risk) and may facilitate the assessment of the impact of environmental changes on community dynamics and conservation.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/15694
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.12045
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Norwegian University of Science And Technology (NTNU)
Biological and Environmental Sciences
Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
Norwegian University of Science And Technology (NTNU)
Norwegian University of Science And Technology (NTNU)
Norwegian University of Science And Technology (NTNU)

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