Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/1176
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Forest elephant crisis in the Congo Basin
Authors: Blake, Stephen
Strindberg, Samantha
Boudjan, Patrick
Makombo, Calixte
Inogwabini, Bila-Isia
Ilambu, Omari
Grossmann, Falk
Bene-Bene, Lambert
de, Semboli Bruno
Mbenzo, Valentin
S'hwa, Dino
Bayogo, Rosine
Williamson, Elizabeth A
Fay, Mike
Hart, John
Maisels, Fiona
Contact Email: e.a.williamson@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Apr-2007
Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Citation: Blake S, Strindberg S, Boudjan P, Makombo C, Inogwabini B, Ilambu O, Grossmann F, Bene-Bene L, de Semboli B, Mbenzo V, S'hwa D, Bayogo R, Williamson EA, Fay M, Hart J & Maisels F (2007) Forest elephant crisis in the Congo Basin, PLoS Biology, 5 (4), p. e111.
Abstract: Debate over repealing the ivory trade ban dominates conferences of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). Resolving this controversy requires accurate estimates of elephant population trends and rates of illegal killing. Most African savannah elephant populations are well known; however, the status of forest elephants, perhaps a distinct species, in the vast Congo Basin is unclear. We assessed population status and incidence of poaching from line-transect and reconnaissance surveys conducted on foot in sites throughout the Congo Basin. Results indicate that the abundance and range of forest elephants are threatened from poaching that is most intense close to roads. The probability of elephant presence increased with distance to roads, whereas that of human signs declined. At all distances from roads, the probability of elephant occurrence was always higher inside, compared to outside, protected areas, whereas that of humans was always lower. Inside protected areas, forest elephant density was correlated with the size of remote forest core, but not with size of protected area. Forest elephants must be prioritised in elephant management planning at the continental scale.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/1176
URL: http://biology.plosjournals.org/
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.0050111
Rights: Published in PLoS Biology by the Public Library of Science (PLoS).; Open Access. Publisher statement: "This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited". http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/
Affiliation: University of Maryland
Wildlife Conservation Society (Africa Program)
Wildlife Conservation Society (Africa Program)
Wildlife Conservation Society (Africa Program)
Wildlife Conservation Society (Africa Program)
Wildlife Conservation Society (Africa Program)
Wildlife Conservation Society (Africa Program)
World Wildlife Fund for Nature (WWF)
WWF Central Africa Regional Programme Office (Cameroon)
Wildlife Conservation Society (Africa Program)
Wildlife Conservation Society (Africa Program)
Bangassou Forest Project (Central African Republic)
Psychology
Wildlife Conservation Society (Africa Program)
Wildlife Conservation Society (Africa Program)
Wildlife Conservation Society (Africa Program)

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