Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/11528
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Unconscious effects of language-specific terminology on preattentive color perception
Authors: Thierry, Guillaume
Athanasopoulos, Panos
Wiggett, Alison
Dering, Benjamin
Kuipers, Jan Rouke
Contact Email: b.r.dering@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: cognition
cultural differences
event-related potentials
linguistic relativity
visual mismatch negativity
Issue Date: 17-Mar-2009
Publisher: National Academy of Sciences
Citation: Thierry G, Athanasopoulos P, Wiggett A, Dering B & Kuipers JR (2009) Unconscious effects of language-specific terminology on preattentive color perception, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 106 (11), pp. 4567-4570.
Abstract: It is now established that native language affects one's perception of the world. However, it is unknown whether this effect is merely driven by conscious, language-based evaluation of the environment or whether it reflects fundamental differences in perceptual processing between individuals speaking different languages. Using brain potentials, we demonstrate that the existence in Greek of 2 color terms -- ghalazio and ble -- distinguishing light and dark blue leads to greater and faster perceptual discrimination of these colors in native speakers of Greek than in native speakers of English. The visual mismatch negativity, an index of automatic and preattentive change detection, was similar for blue and green deviant stimuli during a color oddball detection task in English participants, but it was significantly larger for blue than green deviant stimuli in native speakers of Greek. These findings establish an implicit effect of language-specific terminology on human color perception.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/11528
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0811155106
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Bangor University
Newcastle University
Bangor University
Psychology
Psychology

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