Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/11526
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Whole-face procedures for recovering facial images from memory
Authors: Frowd, Charlie D
Skelton, Faye Collette
Hepton, Gemma
Holden, Laura
Minahil, Simra
Pitchford, Melanie
McIntyre, Alex H
Brown, Charity
Hancock, Peter J B
Contact Email: pjbh1@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Facial composite
Holistic face-processing
Interview
Witness
Face recognition
Issue Date: Jun-2013
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Frowd CD, Skelton FC, Hepton G, Holden L, Minahil S, Pitchford M, McIntyre AH, Brown C & Hancock PJB (2013) Whole-face procedures for recovering facial images from memory, Science and Justice, 53 (2), pp. 89-97.
Abstract: Research has indicated that traditional methods for accessing facial memories usually yield unidentifiable images. Recent research, however, has made important improvements in this area to the witness interview, method used for constructing the face and recognition of finished composites. Here, we investigated whether three of these improvements would produce even-more recognisable images when used in conjunction with each other. The techniques are holistic in nature: they involve processes which operate on an entire face. Forty participants first inspected an unfamiliar target face. Nominally 24h later, they were interviewed using a standard type of cognitive interview (CI) to recall the appearance of the target, or an enhanced 'holistic' interview where the CI was followed by procedures for focussing on the target's character. Participants then constructed a composite using EvoFIT, a recognition-type system that requires repeatedly selecting items from face arrays, with 'breeding', to 'evolve' a composite. They either saw faces in these arrays with blurred external features, or an enhanced method where these faces were presented with masked external features. Then, further participants attempted to name the composites, first by looking at the face front-on, the normal method, and then for a second time by looking at the face side-on, which research demonstrates facilitates recognition. All techniques improved correct naming on their own, but together promoted highly-recognisable composites with mean naming at 74% correct. The implication is that these techniques, if used together by practitioners, should substantially increase the detection of suspects using this forensic method of person identification.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/11526
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scijus.2012.12.004
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Central Lancashire
University of Central Lancashire
University of Central Lancashire
University of Central Lancashire
University of Central Lancashire
Lancaster University
Psychology
University of Leeds
Psychology

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