Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/10887
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Opposite-sex siblings decrease attraction, but not prosocial attributions, to self-resembling opposite-sex faces
Authors: DeBruine, Lisa M
Jones, Benedict C
Watkins, Christopher D
Roberts, S Craig
Little, Anthony
Smith, Finlay G
Quist, Michelle C
Contact Email: craig.roberts@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: inclusive fitness
incest avoidance
optimal outbreeding
individual differences
face perception
Issue Date: 12-Jul-2011
Publisher: National Academy of Sciences
Citation: DeBruine LM, Jones BC, Watkins CD, Roberts SC, Little A, Smith FG & Quist MC (2011) Opposite-sex siblings decrease attraction, but not prosocial attributions, to self-resembling opposite-sex faces, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108 (28), pp. 11710-11714.
Abstract: Contextual cues of genetic relatedness to familiar individuals, such as cosocialization and maternal-perinatal association, modulate prosocial and inbreeding-avoidance behaviors toward specific potential siblings. These findings have been interpreted as evidence that contextual cues of kinship indirectly influence social behavior by affecting the perceived probability of genetic relatedness to familiar individuals. Here, we test a more general alternative model in which contextual cues of kinship can influence the kin-recognition system more directly, changing how the mechanisms that regulate social behavior respond to cues of kinship, even in unfamiliar individuals for whom contextual cues of kinship are absent. We show that having opposite-sex siblings influences inbreeding-relevant perceptions of facial resemblance but not prosocial perceptions. Women with brothers were less attracted to self-resembling, unfamiliar male faces than were women without brothers, and both groups found self-resemblance to be equally trustworthy for the same faces. Further analyses suggest that this effect is driven by younger, rather than older, brothers, consistent with the proposal that only younger siblings exhibit the strong kinship cue of maternal-perinatal association. Our findings provide evidence that experience with opposite-sex siblings can directly influence inbreeding-avoidance mechanisms and demonstrate a striking functional dissociation between the mechanisms that regulate inbreeding and the mechanisms that regulate prosocial behavior toward kin.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/10887
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1105919108
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
Psychology
Psychology
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen

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