Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/10633
Appears in Collections:Biological and Environmental Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Long-term woodland dynamics in West Glen Affric, northern Scotland
Authors: Tipping, Richard
Davies, Althea
Contact Email: rt1@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Jul-2006
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Citation: Tipping R & Davies A (2006) Long-term woodland dynamics in West Glen Affric, northern Scotland, Forestry, 79 (3), pp. 351-359.
Abstract: The former woodlands west of Loch Affric are described from pollen analyses. Related records of climate change from the analysis of lake-level change and peat growth are also presented to explore the importance of climate in driving woodland change. The woodlands were more diverse than extant pinewoods to the east, with a very considerable deciduous component. They developed in the early Holocene period, and brief periods of range expansion and contraction are recorded within a pattern of overall woodland stability over thousands of years, despite the high frequency and intensity of climatic excursions, until a final collapse in all woodland communities occurred at around 4000 calibrated years ago (BP). This collapse had a climatic origin, but the precise character of the climate change is ill-defined.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/10633
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/forestry/cpl022
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Biological and Environmental Sciences
University of Stirling

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