Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/10290
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: "We drink, therefore we are": The role of group identification and norms in sustaining and challenging heavy drinking "culture"
Authors: Livingstone, Andrew G
Young, Hollie
Manstead, Antony S R
Contact Email: a.g.livingstone@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: attitudes
group identification
group processes
heavy drinking
norms
Issue Date: 2011
Publisher: SAGE
Citation: Livingstone AG, Young H & Manstead ASR (2011) "We drink, therefore we are": The role of group identification and norms in sustaining and challenging heavy drinking "culture", Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 14 (5), pp. 637-649.
Abstract: We consider how ingroup norms, identification and individual attitudes interact when a behaviour (heavy alcohol consumption) is defining of an ingroup identity. We sampled 115 students at a UK university, measuring ingroup identification and attitudes to heavy drinking before manipulating the ingroup drinking norm (moderate vs. heavy). Heavy drinking intentions and tendencies to socially include/exclude two target students-one of whom drank alcohol regularly and one of whom did not-were measured. As predicted, participants with a positive attitude to heavy drinking and who identified strongly with the ingroup reported stronger intentions to drink heavily when the ingroup had a moderate, rather than a heavy drinking norm, indicating resistance to the normative information. A complementary pattern emerged for the social inclusion/exclusion measures. Implications for theory and interventions that focus on group norms are discussed.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/10290
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1368430210392399
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Psychology
Cardiff University
Cardiff University

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