Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/10141
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Incentives as connectors: insights into a breastfeeding incentive intervention in a disadvantaged area of North-West England
Authors: Thomson, Gill
Dykes, Fiona
Hurley, Margaret
Hoddinott, Pat
Contact Email: p.m.hoddinott@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Breastfeeding
Incentive
Peer support
Qualitative
Before and after cohort
Issue Date: 29-Mar-2012
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd
Citation: Thomson G, Dykes F, Hurley M & Hoddinott P (2012) Incentives as connectors: insights into a breastfeeding incentive intervention in a disadvantaged area of North-West England, BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 12 (22).
Abstract: Background: Incentive or reward schemes are becoming increasingly popular to motivate healthy lifestyle behaviours. In this paper, insights from a qualitative and descriptive study to investigate the uptake, impact and meanings of a breastfeeding incentive intervention integrated into an existing peer support programme (Star Buddies) are reported. The Star Buddies service employs breastfeeding peer supporters to support women across the ante-natal, intra-partum and post-partum period. Methods: In a disadvantaged area of North West England, women initiating breastfeeding were recruited by peer supporters on the postnatal ward or soon after hospital discharge to participate in an 8 week incentive (gifts and vouchers) and breastfeeding peer supporter intervention. In-depth interviews were conducted with 26 women participants who engaged with the incentive intervention, and a focus group was held with the 4 community peer supporters who delivered the intervention. Descriptive analysis of routinely collected data for peer supporter contacts and breastfeeding outcomes before and after the incentive intervention triangulated and retrospectively provided the context for the qualitative thematic analysis. Results: A global theme emerged of 'incentives as connectors', with two sub-themes of 'facilitating connections' and 'facilitating relationships and wellbeing'. The incentives were linked to discussion themes and gift giving facilitated peer supporter access for proactive weekly home visits to support women. Regular face to face contacts enabled meaningful relationships and new connections within and between the women, families, peer supporters and care providers to be formed and sustained. Participants in the incentive scheme received more home visits and total contact time with peer supporters compared to women before the incentive intervention. Full participation levels and breastfeeding rates at 6-8 weeks were similar for women before and after the incentive intervention. Conclusion: The findings suggest that whilst the provision of incentives might not influence women's intentions or motivations to breastfeed, the connections forged provided psycho-social benefits for both programme users and peer supporters.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/10141
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2393-12-22
Rights: This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 2012, 12:22 doi:10.1186/1471-2393-12-22 The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2393/12/22
Affiliation: University of Central Lancashire
University of Central Lancashire
University of Central Lancashire
HS Research - Stirling

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