Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/10041
Appears in Collections:Psychology Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Ganging up or sticking together? Group processes and children's responses to text-message bullying
Authors: Jones, Sian E
Manstead, Antony S R
Livingstone, Andrew G
Contact Email: a.g.livingstone@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Mar-2011
Publisher: British Psychological Society/ Wiley-Blackwell
Citation: Jones SE, Manstead ASR & Livingstone AG (2011) Ganging up or sticking together? Group processes and children's responses to text-message bullying, British Journal of Psychology, 102 (1), pp. 71-96.
Abstract: Drawing on social identity theory and intergroup emotion theory (IET), we examined group processes underlying bullying behaviour. Children were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a perpetrator's group, a target's group, or a third party group. They then read a gender-consistent scenario in which the norm of the perpetrator's group (to be kind or unkind towards others) was manipulated, and an instance of cyberbullying between the perpetrator's group and a member of the target's group was described. It was found that group membership, group norms, and the proposed antecedents of the group-based emotions of pride, shame, and anger (but not guilt) influenced group-based emotions and action tendencies in ways predicted by social identity and IET. The results underline the importance of understanding group-level emotional reactions when it comes to tackling bullying, and show that being part of a group can be helpful in overcoming the negative effects of bullying.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/10041
URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1348/000712610X502826/abstract
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Cardiff University
Cardiff University
Psychology

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