Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31965
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: How does physical activity benefit people living with dementia? A systematic review to identify the potential mechanisms of action
Author(s): Pringle, Jan
Jepson, Ruth
Dawson, Alison
McCabe, Louise
Bowes, Alison
Contact Email: a.m.bowes@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Dementia
Alzheimer's
Physical activity
cognitive impairment
ageing
Systematic review
Citation: Pringle J, Jepson R, Dawson A, McCabe L & Bowes A (2020) How does physical activity benefit people living with dementia? A systematic review to identify the potential mechanisms of action. Quality in Ageing and Older Adults. https://doi.org/10.1108/QAOA-09-2020-0046
Abstract: Purpose: One limitation of research that assesses the effectiveness of physical activity interventions for people with dementia is that most do not describe the intervention in sufficient detail to ascertain a theoretical basis or mechanism of action that determines the effective components. This paper identifies studies which evaluate the mechanisms of action of physical activity interventions for people with dementia, to further inform effective intervention development. Method: Systematic review. Papers were screened for evidence of evaluation of specific forms of physical activity, using pre-defined inclusion criteria. Analysis was conducted to ascertain if mechanisms of action were corroborated by data within and between studies. Findings: We identified 26 studies with a measured mechanism of action; these related to the effects of physical activity on either neurological structure or endocrinal markers, including hormones. Physical activity had potential to reduce hippocampal atrophy, increase neural recruitment, activate the noradrenergic system, and improve antiinflammatory responses. While individual studies were hampered by small sample sizes, the body of evidence indicated that physical activity may have potential to delay cognitive decline. Implications: Mechanisms of action in relation to dementia and physical activity are likely to be multifaceted, and physical activity may be protective against progression in the early stages of cognitive decline. Physical activity may be of greatest benefit if incorporated into on-going lifestyle, rather than engaged in for short periods, and combined with social interaction. Originality: This paper is unique in its focus on the mechanisms of action of physical activity interventions for people with dementia.
DOI Link: 10.1108/QAOA-09-2020-0046
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Notes: Output Status: Forthcoming

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