Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31408
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport eTheses
Title: Mental Toughness, Mental Well-being, and Performance within a British Army Recruit Training Environment
Author(s): Coffey, David Malcolm
Supervisor(s): Coffee, Pete
Arthur, Calum
Keywords: mental toughness
mental well-being
Issue Date: 30-Nov-2019
Publisher: University of Stirling
Abstract: The purpose of the current exploratory study was to examine the relationship between mental toughness (MT), mental well-being (MWB) and individual performance within a British military phase -1 training establishment. A cohort of military recruits were recruited (n = 268) of which 212 (79.1%) were male and 56 (20.9%) female. Both self-report and observer-rated measures were administered over a 12 month period at weeks 4 and 13 of the 14 week training course. Results revealed no significant positive relationship between MT and individual performance, and no significant increase in MT as a result of phase 1 military training. However, a significant relationship was revealed between MWB at week 13 and performance (including when controlling for values at week 4), and there was an increase in levels of MWB between weeks 4 and 13. Furthermore, follow up analyses revealed that both dimensions of MWB (eudaimonic, hedonic) contributed to the significant increase in individual performance at the end of Phase-1 training at week 13. In summary, the current study reveals that MWB is a significant positive predictor of performance within a Phase - 1 military training environment. However, for MWB and performance to be positively developed, the current study highlights that both the eudaimonic and hedonic dimensions of the construct must be experienced and supported.
Type: Thesis or Dissertation
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31408

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