Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31292
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dc.contributor.authorMcGreary, Michael Jen_UK
dc.contributor.authorEubank, Martin Ren_UK
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Roberten_UK
dc.contributor.authorWhitehead, Amy Een_UK
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-16T14:57:43Z-
dc.date.available2020-06-16T14:57:43Z-
dc.date.issued2020-07-08en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/31292-
dc.description.abstractThe present study examined stress and coping of cricket batsmen during challenge and threat states using the Think-Aloud method. Ten male elite-level junior cricket batsmen took part in the study. A repeated measures design was implemented, with participants verbalizing while both in (a) a threat state and (b) a challenge state. Participants were required to score 36 runs in 30 balls during the threat condition and 15 runs in 30 balls during the challenge condition. Verbalizations were subsequently transcribed verbatim and analyzed for stressors, coping strategies, and any other reoccurring themes. A paired-samples t-test was conducted to examine differences in the number of verbalizations made for each theme between conditions. Ten secondary themes were grouped into four primary themes; these included (a) stressors, (b) problem-focused coping, (c) emotion-focused coping, and (d) gathering information. There were significant differences( p≤0.05) between stressor verbalizations, with significantly more verbalizations made by participants during a threat state. No significant differences were found between any other themes. Thus, during a threat state, participants reported significantly more stressor verbalizations compared to a challenge state, while there were no significant differences in coping strategies reported (p>0.05). This finding offers a potential explanation for why athletic performance diminishes when in a threat state, as athletes then experience a greater number of stressors but do not report engaging in more coping strategies.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_UK
dc.relationMcGreary MJ, Eubank MR, Morris R & Whitehead AE (2020) Thinking Aloud: Stress and coping in junior cricket batsman during challenge and threat states. Perceptual and Motor Skills. https://doi.org/10.1177/0031512520938911en_UK
dc.rightsMcGreary MJ, Whitehead AE, Eubank MR & Morris R, hinking Aloud: Stress and coping in junior cricket batsman during challenge and threat states, Perceptual and Motor Skills (Forthcoming). Copyright © The Authors 2020. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/0031512520938911en_UK
dc.rights.urihttps://storre.stir.ac.uk/STORREEndUserLicence.pdfen_UK
dc.subjectConcurrent verbalizationsen_UK
dc.subjectstressen_UK
dc.subjectcopingen_UK
dc.subjectcricketen_UK
dc.subjectthink-alouden_UK
dc.titleThinking Aloud: Stress and coping in junior cricket batsman during challenge and threat statesen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0031512520938911en_UK
dc.citation.jtitlePerceptual and Motor Skillsen_UK
dc.citation.issn1558-688Xen_UK
dc.citation.issn0031-5125en_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusAM - Accepted Manuscripten_UK
dc.author.emailrobert.morris@stir.ac.uken_UK
dc.citation.date08/07/2020en_UK
dc.description.notesOutput Status: Forthcoming/Available Onlineen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity Campus North Lincolnshireen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationLiverpool John Moores Universityen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationSporten_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationLiverpool John Moores Universityen_UK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000548256100001en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid1633286en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-1481-1264en_UK
dc.date.accepted2020-06-11en_UK
dc.date.filedepositdate2020-06-11en_UK
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles

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