Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31230
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Longitudinal evaluation of the effects of illness perceptions and beliefs about cardiac rehabilitation on quality of life of patients with coronary artery disease and their caregivers
Author(s): Thomson, Patricia
Angus, Neil J
Andreis, Federico
Rushworth, Gordon F
Mohan, Andrea R
Chung, Misook L
Leslie, Stephen J
Keywords: Cardiac rehabilitation
Illness perceptions
Beliefs about cardiac rehabilitation
Physical health
Mental health
The actor-partner interdependence model
Issue Date: 2020
Citation: Thomson P, Angus NJ, Andreis F, Rushworth GF, Mohan AR, Chung ML & Leslie SJ (2020) Longitudinal evaluation of the effects of illness perceptions and beliefs about cardiac rehabilitation on quality of life of patients with coronary artery disease and their caregivers. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 18 (1), Art. No.: 158. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12955-020-01405-0
Abstract: Background Patients’ negative illness perceptions and beliefs about cardiac rehabilitation (CR) can influence uptake and adherence to CR. Little is known about the interpartner influence of these antecedent variables on quality of life of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and their family caregivers. The aims of the study were: 1) to assess differences in illness perceptions, beliefs about CR and quality of life between patients with CAD and their family caregivers upon entry to a CR programme and at 6 months follow-up; and 2) to examine whether patients’ and caregivers’ perceptions of the patient’s illness and beliefs about CR at baseline predict their own and their partner’s quality of life at 6 months. Methods In this longitudinal study of 40 patient-caregiver dyads from one CR service, patients completed the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and Beliefs about Cardiac Rehabilitation Questionnaire at baseline and 6 months; and caregivers completed these questionnaires based on their views about the patient’s illness and CR. The Short-Form 12 Health Survey was used to assess patients’ and caregivers’ perceived health status. Dyadic data were analysed using the Actor–Partner Interdependence Model. Results Most patients (70%) were men, mean age 62.45 years; and most caregivers (70%) were women, mean age 59.55 years. Caregivers were more concerned about the patient’s illness than the patients themselves; although they had similar scores for beliefs about CR. Patients had poorer physical health than caregivers, but their level of mental health was similar. Caregivers’ poorer mental health at 6 months was predicted by the patient’s perceptions of timeline and illness concern (i.e. partner effects). Patient’s and caregiver’s illness perceptions and beliefs about CR were associated with their own physical and mental health at 6 months (i.e. actor effects). Conclusions Overall, the patients and caregivers had similar scores for illness perceptions and beliefs about CR. The actor and partner effect results indicate a need to focus on specific illness perceptions and beliefs about CR, targeting both the individual and the dyad, early in the rehabilitation process to help improve patients and caregivers physical and mental health (outcomes).
DOI Link: 10.1186/s12955-020-01405-0
Rights: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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