Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31210
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dc.contributor.authorVine, Angusen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-30T00:01:12Z-
dc.date.available2020-05-30T00:01:12Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/31210-
dc.description.abstractFirst paragraph: In the second part of Don Quixote (1615) Miguel de Cervantes’s eponymous hero plumbs the depths of the miraculous cave of Montesinos. What the Don sees underground is wondrous indeed: a crystalline palace, an alabaster hall, and finally a marble tomb of exquisite craft, upon which lies not a carved figure, but preternaturally preserved flesh and bones. Don Quixote’s vision in the cave is important for all sorts of reasons. For one thing, it is an early, and remarkable, episode of speluncean literature. For another, it speaks of the author’s interest, sometimes parodic, in fact and fiction, curiosity and wonder, imagination and vision. But it is also important because it centres on a tomb. For tombs in early modern Europe, Catholic and Protestant, were big business. And if tombs were important, the epitaphs carved on them, as Scott Newstok reminds us in his recent book, were even more so. In Don Quixote the tomb is unadorned, as the knight, Durandarte, lies enchanted and perfectly preserved. But in general in the early modern period it was epitaphs that preserved the memory of the dead, not Merlin’s magic or some other enchantment. As William Camden put it in 1600, in an essay on epitaphs from which Newstok quotes, ‘epitaphes have alwayes bene most respected, for in them love was shewed to the deceased, memory was continued to posterity, friends were comforted, and the reader put in mind of humane fraylty’. To paraphrase Propertius, verse preserves, where bronze and marble merely deceive.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherJournal of the Northern Renaissanceen_UK
dc.relationVine A (2010) Scott L. Newstok, Quoting Death in Early Modern England: The Poetics of Epitaphs Beyond the Tomb (2009). Review of: Scott L. Newstok, Quoting Death in Early Modern England: The Poetics of Epitaphs Beyond the Tomb (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009). Journal of the Northern Renaissance, 2010. http://www.northernrenaissance.org/scott-l-newstok-quoting-death-in-early-modern-england-the-poetics-of-epitaphs-beyond-the-tomb-palgrave-macmillan-2009/en_UK
dc.relation.isbasedonScott L. Newstok, Quoting Death in Early Modern England: The Poetics of Epitaphs Beyond the Tomb (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009)en_UK
dc.rightsPublished under a Creative Commons License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/deed.en_US)en_UK
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/en_UK
dc.titleScott L. Newstok, Quoting Death in Early Modern England: The Poetics of Epitaphs Beyond the Tomb (2009)en_UK
dc.typeBook Reviewen_UK
dc.citation.jtitleJournal of the Northern Renaissanceen_UK
dc.citation.issn1759-3085en_UK
dc.citation.volume2010en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedUnrefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusVoR - Version of Recorden_UK
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.northernrenaissance.org/scott-l-newstok-quoting-death-in-early-modern-england-the-poetics-of-epitaphs-beyond-the-tomb-palgrave-macmillan-2009/en_UK
dc.description.notesOutput Type: Book Reviewen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Sussexen_UK
dc.identifier.wtid1512526en_UK
dc.date.filedepositdate2020-05-29en_UK
Appears in Collections:Literature and Languages Book Reviews

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