Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31050
Appears in Collections:History and Politics Newspaper/Magazine Articles
Title: Coronavirus: why French sex workers seeking support from government are unlikely to receive funding
Author(s): St Denny, Emily
Keywords: France
Coronavirus
Prostitution
COVID-19 lockdown
Issue Date: 17-Apr-2020
Publisher: The Conversation Trust
Citation: St Denny E (2020) Coronavirus: why French sex workers seeking support from government are unlikely to receive funding. The Conversation. 17.04.2020. https://theconversation.com/coronavirus-why-french-sex-workers-seeking-support-from-government-are-unlikely-to-receive-funding-136589
Abstract: First paragraph: In France, where prostitution is partly criminalised, it is illegal to buy sexual services but legal for a woman or a man to sell sex. And anyone selling sex must pay taxes like everyone else. But many people in prostitution – some of whom consider themselves “sex workers” and therefore believe they should be entitled to workers’ rights and protection – are not currently eligible for state income support, despite seeing their income disappear as a result of the nationwide COVID-19 lockdown.
Type: Newspaper/Magazine Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/31050
Rights: The Conversation uses a Creative Commons Attribution NoDerivatives licence. You can republish their articles for free, online or in print. Licence information is available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/
Affiliation: Politics
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/

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