Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/30998
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Occupational inequalities in volunteering participation: Using detailed data on jobs to explore the influence of habits and circumstances
Author(s): Lambert, Paul
Rutherford, Alasdair
Contact Email: paul.lambert@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Apr-2020
Citation: Lambert P & Rutherford A (2020) Occupational inequalities in volunteering participation: Using detailed data on jobs to explore the influence of habits and circumstances. British Journal of Sociology. https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-4446.12756
Abstract: In this paper we present empirical results that show that detailed occupations have distinctive patterns of association with voluntary participation. We draw upon data from four secondary survey datasets from the UK (coverage 1972-2012). Occupations are shown to link to volunteering in a wide range of scenarios and in individual, household, and longitudinal contexts. We argue that these linkages provide insight into social inequalities in volunteering, and that they can help us to understand the relative influence of ‘circumstances’ and ‘habits’ in enabling or inhibiting voluntary participation.
DOI Link: 10.1111/1468-4446.12756
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Notes: Output Status: Forthcoming/Available Online

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