Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/30915
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Adolescents' reactions to adverts for fast-food and confectionery brands that are high in fat, salt, and/or sugar (HFSS), and possible implications for future research and regulation: Findings from a cross-sectional survey of 11-19 year olds in the United Kingdom
Author(s): Critchlow, Nathan
Newberry Le Vay, Jessica
MacKintosh, Anne Marie
Hooper, Lucie
Thomas, Christopher
Vohra, Jyotsna
Contact Email: nathan.critchlow@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Marketing
Advertising
HFSS
Junk food
Reactions
Obesity
Overweight
Adolescents
Food policy
Regulation
Issue Date: Mar-2020
Citation: Critchlow N, Newberry Le Vay J, MacKintosh AM, Hooper L, Thomas C & Vohra J (2020) Adolescents' reactions to adverts for fast-food and confectionery brands that are high in fat, salt, and/or sugar (HFSS), and possible implications for future research and regulation: Findings from a cross-sectional survey of 11-19 year olds in the United Kingdom. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 (5), Art. No.: 1689. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051689
Abstract: The influence that marketing for foods high in fat, salt, and/or sugar (HFSS) has on adolescents extends beyond a dose-response relationship between exposure and consumption. It is also important to explore how marketing shapes or reinforces product/brand attitudes, and whether this varies by demography and Body Mass Index (BMI). To examine this, a cross-sectional survey was conducted with 11–19 year olds in the United Kingdom (n = 3348). Participants watched 30 s video adverts for a fast-food and confectionery brand. For each advert, participants reported reactions on eight measures (e.g., 1 = Makes [product] seem unpopular choice–5 = Makes [product] seem popular choice), which were binary coded based on whether a positive reaction was reported (Yes/No). At least half of adolescents had positive reactions to both adverts for 5/8 measures. Positive reactions had associations with age, gender and, to a lesser extent, BMI. For example, 11–15 year olds were more likely than 16–19 year olds to report appeal to their age group for the fast-food (OR = 1.33, 95% CI: 1.13–1.58) and confectionery advert (OR = 1.79, 95% CI: 1.51–2.11). If these reactions are typical of other HFSS products, future research and regulatory change should examine whether additional controls on the content of HFSS marketing, for example mandated health or nutritional information and revised definitions of youth appeal, offer additional protection to young people.
DOI Link: 10.3390/ijerph17051689
Rights: This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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