Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/30609
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Scale-up and scale-out of a gender-sensitized weight management and healthy living program delivered to overweight men via professional sports clubs: the wider implementation of Football Fans in Training (FFIT)
Author(s): Hunt, Kate
Wyke, Sally
Bunn, Christopher
Donnachie, Craig
Reid, Nicky
Gray, Cindy M
Contact Email: kate.hunt@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: obesity
men’s health
weight loss interventions
health behavior change
physical activity
context
implementation
scalability and sustainability of interventions
scale-up
scale-out
Issue Date: Jan-2020
Citation: Hunt K, Wyke S, Bunn C, Donnachie C, Reid N & Gray CM (2020) Scale-up and scale-out of a gender-sensitized weight management and healthy living program delivered to overweight men via professional sports clubs: the wider implementation of Football Fans in Training (FFIT). International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17 (2), Art. No.: 584. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020584
Abstract: Increasing prevalence of obesity poses challenges for public health. Men have been under-served by weight management programs, highlighting a need for gender-sensitized programs which can be embedded into routine practice or adapted for new settings/populations, to accelerate the process of implementing programs which are successful and cost-effective under research conditions. To address gaps in examples of how to bridge the research to practice gap, we describe the scale-up and scale-out of Football Fans in Training (FFIT), a weight management and healthy living program in relation to two implementation frameworks. The paper presents the development, evaluation and scale-up of FFIT, mapped onto the PRACTIS guide; outcomes in scale-up deliveries and the scale-out of FFIT through programs delivered in other contexts (other countries, professional sports, target groups, public health focus). FFIT has been scaled-up through a single-license franchise model in over 40 UK professional football clubs to 2019 (and 30 more from 2020) and scaled-out into football and other sporting contexts in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, England and other European countries. The successful scale-up and scale-out of FFIT demonstrates that, with attention to cultural constructions of masculinity, public health interventions can appeal to men and support them in sustainable lifestyle change.
DOI Link: 10.3390/ijerph17020584
Rights: This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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