Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/30563
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Fathers' Views and Experiences of Creating a Smoke-Free Home: A Scoping Review
Author(s): O'Donnell, Rachel
Angus, Kathryn
McCulloch, Peter
Amos, Amanda
Greaves, Lorraine
Semple, Sean
Keywords: scoping review
barriers
facilitators
fathers
males
gender
smoking
smoke‐free home
second‐hand smoke
Issue Date: Dec-2019
Citation: O'Donnell R, Angus K, McCulloch P, Amos A, Greaves L & Semple S (2019) Fathers' Views and Experiences of Creating a Smoke-Free Home: A Scoping Review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16 (24), Art. No.: 5164. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16245164
Abstract: Enabling parents to create a smoke‐free home is one of the key ways that children’s exposure to second‐hand smoke (SHS) can be reduced. Smoke‐free home interventions have largely targeted mothers who smoke, and there is little understanding of the barriers and facilitators that fathers experience in creating a smoke‐free home. Systematic searches combining terms for fathers, homes, and SHS exposure were run in April 2019 in Web of Science’s Citation Indices, PsycINFO, and PubMed for English‐language studies published since 2008. The searches identified 980 records for screening, plus 66 records from other sources. Twelve studies reported in 13 papers were included in this scoping review. Eight of the studies were conducted in Asian countries (five in China, one in India, one in Japan, and one in Iran), three were conducted in Canada, and one in Turkey. Findings were extracted in verbatim text for thematic analysis. The review identified that attitudes and knowledge, cultural and social norms, gender power relations, and shifting perceptions and responsibilities related to fatherhood can impact on fathers’ views of their role in relation to creating and maintaining a smoke‐free home. There were too few published studies that had assessed smoke‐free home interventions with fathers to draw conclusions regarding effective approaches. Research is clearly needed to inform our understanding of fathers’ roles, successes and challenges in creating and maintaining a smoke‐free home, so that father‐inclusive rather than mother‐led interventions can be developed to benefit entire households and improve gender equity as well as health.
DOI Link: 10.3390/ijerph16245164
Rights: This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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