Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/30165
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dc.contributor.authorBibbey, Adamen_UK
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Anna Cen_UK
dc.contributor.authorGinty, Annie Ten_UK
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Douglasen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-26T00:01:10Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-26T00:01:10Z-
dc.date.issued2015-06en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/30165-
dc.description.abstractBackground and aims Problematic Internet use and excessive alcohol consumption have been associated with a host of maladaptive outcomes. Further, low (blunted) cardiovascular and stress hormone (e.g. cortisol) reactions to acute psychological stress are a feature of individuals with a range of adverse health and behavioural characteristics, including dependencies such as tobacco and alcohol addiction. The present study extended this research by examining whether behavioural dependencies, namely problematic Internet use, excessive alcohol consumption, and their comorbidity would also be associated with blunted stress reactivity Methods A large sample of university students (N = 2313) were screened using Internet and alcohol dependency questionnaires to select four groups for laboratory testing: comorbid Internet and alcohol dependence (N = 17), Internet dependence (N = 17), alcohol dependence (N = 28), and non-dependent controls (N = 26). Cardiovascular activity and salivary cortisol were measured at rest and in response to a psychological stress protocol comprising of mental arithmetic and public speaking tasks. Results Neither problematic Internet behaviour nor excessive alcohol consumption, either individually or in combination, were associated with blunted cardiovascular or cortisol stress reactions. Discussion It is possible that problematic Internet behaviour and excessive alcohol consumption in a student population were not related to physiological reactivity as they may not reflect ingrained addictions but rather an impulse control disorder and binging tendency. Conclusions The present results serve to indicate some of the limits of the developing hypothesis that blunted stress reactivity is a peripheral marker of the central motivational dysregulation in the brain underpinning a wide range of health and behavioural problems.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherAkademiai Kiado Zrt.en_UK
dc.relationBibbey A, Phillips AC, Ginty AT & Carroll D (2015) Problematic Internet use, excessive alcohol consumption, their comorbidity and cardiovascular and cortisol reactions to acute psychological stress in a student population. Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 4 (2), pp. 44-52. https://doi.org/10.1556/2006.4.2015.006en_UK
dc.rights© 2015 Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium for non-commercial purposes, provided the original author and source are credited.en_UK
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/en_UK
dc.subjectinternet dependenceen_UK
dc.subjectalcoholen_UK
dc.subjectcomorbid dependenceen_UK
dc.subjectcardiovascular reactivityen_UK
dc.subjectcortisol reactivityen_UK
dc.subjectacute stressen_UK
dc.titleProblematic Internet use, excessive alcohol consumption, their comorbidity and cardiovascular and cortisol reactions to acute psychological stress in a student populationen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1556/2006.4.2015.006en_UK
dc.identifier.pmid26014670en_UK
dc.citation.jtitleJournal of Behavioral Addictionsen_UK
dc.citation.issn2063-5303en_UK
dc.citation.issn2062-5871en_UK
dc.citation.volume4en_UK
dc.citation.issue2en_UK
dc.citation.spage44en_UK
dc.citation.epage52en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusVoR - Version of Recorden_UK
dc.contributor.funderEconomic and Social Research Councilen_UK
dc.author.emaila.c.whittaker@stir.ac.uken_UK
dc.citation.date27/05/2015en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Birminghamen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Birminghamen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Birminghamen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Birminghamen_UK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000357455500003en_UK
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-84967112855en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid1420294en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-5461-0598en_UK
dc.date.accepted2015-02-23en_UK
dc.date.filedepositdate2019-07-30en_UK
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles

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