Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/30164
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHarkins, Stevenen_UK
dc.contributor.authorLugo-Ocando, Jairoen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-26T00:00:57Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-26T00:00:57Z-
dc.date.issued2015en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/30164-
dc.description.abstractThis article argues that Malthusianism as a series of discursive regimes, developed in the Victorian-era, serves in times of austerity to reproduce an elite understanding of social exclusion in which those in a state of poverty are to blame for their own situation. It highlights that Malthusianism is present in the public discourse, becoming an underlining feature in news coverage of the so-called ‘underclass’. Our findings broadly contradict the normative claim that journalism ‘speaks truth to power’, and suggest instead that overall as a political practice, journalism tends to reproduce and reinforce hegemonic discourses of power. The piece is based on critical discourse analysis, which has been applied to a significant sample of news articles published by tabloid newspapers in Britain which focussed on the concept of the ‘underclass’. By looking at the evidence, the authors argue that the ‘underclass’ is a concept used by some journalists to cast people living in poverty as ‘undeserving’ of public and state support. In so doing, these journalists help create a narrative which supports cuts in welfare provisions and additional punitive measures against some of the most vulnerable members of society.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherInforma UK Limiteden_UK
dc.relationHarkins S & Lugo-Ocando J (2015) How Malthusian ideology crept into the newsroom: British tabloids and the coverage of the ‘underclass’. Critical Discourse Studies, 13 (1), pp. 78-93. https://doi.org/10.1080/17405904.2015.1074594en_UK
dc.rightsThe publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.en_UK
dc.subjectpovertyen_UK
dc.subjectjournalismen_UK
dc.subjectunderclassen_UK
dc.subjectcritical discourse analysisen_UK
dc.subjectBritainen_UK
dc.subjectnewspaper discourseen_UK
dc.titleHow Malthusian ideology crept into the newsroom: British tabloids and the coverage of the ‘underclass’en_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2999-12-31en_UK
dc.rights.embargoreason[How Malthusian ideology crept into the newsroom British tabloids and the coverage of the underclass.pdf] The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository therefore there is an embargo on the full text of the work.en_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17405904.2015.1074594en_UK
dc.citation.jtitleCritical Discourse Studiesen_UK
dc.citation.issn1740-5912en_UK
dc.citation.issn1740-5904en_UK
dc.citation.volume13en_UK
dc.citation.issue1en_UK
dc.citation.spage78en_UK
dc.citation.epage93en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusVoR - Version of Recorden_UK
dc.contributor.funderEconomic and Social Research Councilen_UK
dc.author.emailsteven.harkins@stir.ac.uken_UK
dc.citation.date28/08/2015en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Sheffielden_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Leedsen_UK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000367355500005en_UK
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-84941360224en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid1421597en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0001-6116-0460en_UK
dc.date.accepted2015-04-25en_UK
dc.description.refREF Compliant by Deposit in Stirling's Repositoryen_UK
dc.date.filedepositdate2019-08-08en_UK
Appears in Collections:Communications, Media and Culture Journal Articles

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
How Malthusian ideology crept into the newsroom British tabloids and the coverage of the underclass.pdfFulltext - Published Version1.45 MBAdobe PDFUnder Permanent Embargo    Request a copy


This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.