Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/30053
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Increased strength is associated with lower trunk muscle activation during loaded back squats and dynamic body weight jumps
Author(s): Clark, David R
Lambert, Michael I
Grigson, Chris
Hunter, Angus M
Contact Email: a.m.hunter1@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: muscular strength
neuromuscular activation
surface EMG
trunk stability
Issue Date: Mar-2020
Citation: Clark DR, Lambert MI, Grigson C & Hunter AM (2020) Increased strength is associated with lower trunk muscle activation during loaded back squats and dynamic body weight jumps. Translational Sports Medicine, 3 (2), pp. 107-118. https://doi.org/10.1002/tsm2.97
Abstract: This study measured how back squat strength (1RM) affected trunk muscle activation in performing squats, squat jump (SJ), and countermovement jump (CMJ). Fifty males, completed two test sessions. Squat 1RM was tested first. Participants were assigned to three groups: (a) strong group (SG), (b) middle group (MG), or (c) weak group (WG), based on relative squat 1RM. Test 2: EMG data were collected for four trunk muscle sites; rectus abdominus, external oblique, lumbar sacral erector spinae, and upper lumbar erector spinae while performing (3 reps) SJ, CMJ, and squats at 65%, 75%, and 95% 1RM. Squat and jump phases were determined from a linear transducer and 30° tertiles for each phase, from a knee goniometer. Normalized root mean square RMS increased significantly with load for each muscle site in both squat phases. Trunk muscle activation was significantly lower in SG vs WG in eccentric and concentric squat phases. Concentric and flight phase RMS in both jumps was lower in SG vs WG. RMS increased significantly for each eccentric tertile and first concentric tertile. Greater squat strength is associated with lower trunk muscle activation in squats and jumps and trunk muscle activation was highest in the two deepest 30° squat segments. In conclusion, back squat strength training to parallel, where top of thighs are horizontal, is an effective method of developing dynamic trunk stability.
DOI Link: 10.1002/tsm2.97
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Clark DR, Lambert MI, Grigson C & Hunter AM (2019) Increased strength is associated with lower trunk muscle activation during loaded back squats and dynamic body weight jumps. Translational Sports Medicine. DOI: 10.1002/tsm2.97, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/tsm2.97. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Non-Commercial Use For non-commercial and non-promotional research and private study purposes individual users may view, print, download and copy self-archived articles, as well as text and data mine the content under the following conditions: The authors' moral rights are not compromised. These rights include the right of "paternity" (the right for the author to be identified as such, also known as "attribution") and "integrity" (the right for the author not to have the work altered in such a way that the author's reputation or integrity may be damaged). All reuse must be fully attributed Where content in the article is identified as belonging to a third party, it is the obligation of the user to ensure that any reuse complies with the copyright policies of the owner of that content Self-archived content may not be re-published verbatim in whole or in part, whether or not for commercial purposes, in print or online. This restriction does not apply to use of quotations with appropriate citation, or text and data mining provided that the mining output is restricted to short excerpts of text and data and excludes images (unless further consent is obtained from Wiley. Commercial "for-profit" Use Use of Wiley Open Access articles for commercial, promotional, or marketing purposes requires further explicit permission from Wiley and will be subject to a fee.

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