Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/29038
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Stop smoking practitioner consensus on barriers and facilitators to smoking cessation in pregnancy and how to address these: A modified Delphi survey
Author(s): Fergie, Libby
Campbell, Katarzyna A
Coleman-Haynes, Tom
Ussher, Michael
Cooper, Sue
Coleman, Tim
Keywords: Smoking cessationPregnancy
Modified Delphi
practitioners' consensus
Barriers/facilitators
Behaviour change techniques
Issue Date: Jun-2019
Citation: Fergie L, Campbell KA, Coleman-Haynes T, Ussher M, Cooper S & Coleman T (2019) Stop smoking practitioner consensus on barriers and facilitators to smoking cessation in pregnancy and how to address these: A modified Delphi survey. Addictive Behaviors Reports, 9, Art. No.: 100164. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.abrep.2019.100164
Abstract: Introduction: Pregnant women can experience barriers and facilitators towards achieving smoking cessation. We sought consensus from smoking cessation practitioners on how influential pre-identified barriers and facilitators can be on pregnant women's smoking behaviour, and how difficult these might be to manage. Suggestions for techniques that could help overcome the barriers or enhance the facilitators were elicited and consensus sought on the appropriateness for their use in practice. Methods: Forty-four practitioners who provided cessation support to pregnant women completed a three-round modified Delphi survey. Round one sought consensus on the ‘influence’ and ‘difficulty’ of the barriers and facilitators, and gathered respondents’ suggestions on ways to address these. Rounds two and three sought further consensus on the barriers and facilitators and on ‘appropriateness’ of the respondent-suggested techniques. The techniques were coded for behaviour change techniques (BCTs) content using existing taxonomies. Results: Barriers and facilitators considered to be the most important mainly related to the influence of significant others and the women's motivation & self-efficacy. Having a supportive partner was considered the most influential, whereas lack of support from partner was the only barrier that reached consensus as being difficult to manage. Barriers relating to social norms were also considered influential, however these received poor coverage of respondent-suggested techniques. Those considered the easiest to address mainly related to aspects of cessation support, including misconceptions surrounding the use of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). Barriers and facilitators relating to the women's motivation & self-efficacy, such as the want to protect the baby, were also considered as being particularly easy to address. Fifty of the 54 respondent-suggested techniques reached consensus as being appropriate. Those considered the most appropriate ranged from providing support early, giving correct information on NRT, highlighting risks and benefits and reinforcing motivating beliefs. Thirty-three BCTs were identified from the respondent-suggested techniques. ‘Social support (unspecified)’ ‘Tailor interactions appropriately’ and ‘Problem solving’ were the most frequently coded BCTs. Conclusions: Involving partners in quit attempts was advocated. Existing support could be potentially improved by establishing appropriate ways to address barriers relating to pregnant smokers’ ‘social norms’. In general, providing consistent and motivating support seemed favourable.
DOI Link: 10.1016/j.abrep.2019.100164
Rights: This article is available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY/4.0/). You may copy and distribute the article, create extracts, abstracts and new works from the article, alter and revise the article, text or data mine the article and otherwise reuse the article commercially (including reuse and/or resale of the article) without permission from Elsevier. You must give appropriate credit to the original work, together with a link to the formal publication through the relevant DOI and a link to the Creative Commons user license above. You must indicate if any changes are made but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use of the work.

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