Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/29025
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Exercise and the onset of disability in later life
Author(s): Hunt, Kate
Adamson, Joy
Ebrahim, Shah
Mutrie, Nanette
Contact Email: kate.hunt@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: exercise
swimming
aged
disability
Issue Date: 1-Sep-2010
Citation: Hunt K, Adamson J, Ebrahim S & Mutrie N (2010) Exercise and the onset of disability in later life. Journal of Aging and Health, 22 (6), pp. 734-747. https://doi.org/10.1177/0898264310374753
Abstract: Objective: This study was to examine whether overall physical activity levels, and different types of earlier sporting activities, are associated with the onset of locomotor disability in early older age. Method: A longitudinal analysis of a general population cohort of British men and women born in the early 1930s was conducted. Results: Measures of overall activity levels at age 58 did not show a relationship with locomotor disability 5-6 years later. Swimming was the only sporting activity to show any strong evidence of a protective association with later locomotor disability. Discussion: The promotion of swimming in adulthood could play a role in the prevention of locomotor disability and aid peoples ability to follow active living health promotion guidelines in late mid-life and early old-age.
DOI Link: 10.1177/0898264310374753
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