Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/29015
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dc.contributor.authorGray, Cindy Men_UK
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Kateen_UK
dc.contributor.authorLorimer, Karenen_UK
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Annie Sen_UK
dc.contributor.authorBenzeval, Michaelaen_UK
dc.contributor.authorWyke, Sallyen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-20T01:03:36Z-
dc.date.available2019-03-20T01:03:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-06-29en_UK
dc.identifier.other513en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/29015-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Health professionals have an important role to play in the management of obesity, but may be unsure how to raise weight issues with patients. The societal stigma associated with excess weight means that weight status terms may be misunderstood, cause offence and risk upsetting patient-professional relationships. This study investigated the views of people who were overweight or obese on the acceptability of weight status terms and their potential to motivate weight loss when used by health professionals. Methods. A qualitative study comprising 34 semi-structured interviews with men and women in their mid-to-late 30s and 50s who were overweight or obese and had recently been informed of their weight status. Thematic framework analysis was conducted to allow the systematic comparison of views by age, gender and apparent motivation to lose weight. Results: Although many people favoured 'Overweight' to describe their weight status, there were doubts about its effectiveness to motivate weight loss. Terms including 'BMI' ('Body Mass Index') or referring to the unhealthy nature of their weight were generally considered acceptable and motivational, although a number of men questioned the validity of BMI as an indicator of excess weight. Participants, particularly women, felt that health professionals should avoid using 'Fat'. Whilst response to 'Obese' was largely negative, people recognised that it could be appropriate in a health consultation. Some younger people, particularly those who appeared motivated to lose weight, felt 'Obese' could encourage weight loss, but it was also clear the term could provoke negative emotions if used insensitively. Conclusions: Although most people who are overweight or obese accept that it is appropriate for health professionals to discuss weight issues with patients, there is great variation in response to the terms commonly used to describe excess weight. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to discussing weight status: some men and younger people may appreciate a direct approach, whilst others need to be treated more sensitively. It is therefore important that health professionals use their knowledge and understanding to select the terms that are most likely to be acceptable, but at the same time have most potential to motivate each individual patient.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherBMCen_UK
dc.relationGray CM, Hunt K, Lorimer K, Anderson AS, Benzeval M & Wyke S (2011) Words matter: A qualitative investigation of which weight status terms are acceptable and motivate weight loss when used by health professionals. BMC Public Health, 11, Art. No.: 513. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-11-513en_UK
dc.rights© Gray et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2011 This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_UK
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/en_UK
dc.subjectHealth Professionalen_UK
dc.subjectWeight Statusen_UK
dc.subjectExcess Weighten_UK
dc.subjectOptimistic Biasen_UK
dc.subjectWeight Issueen_UK
dc.titleWords matter: A qualitative investigation of which weight status terms are acceptable and motivate weight loss when used by health professionalsen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2458-11-513en_UK
dc.identifier.pmid21714892en_UK
dc.citation.jtitleBMC Public Healthen_UK
dc.citation.issn1471-2458en_UK
dc.citation.volume11en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusVoR - Version of Recorden_UK
dc.contributor.funderCancer Research UKen_UK
dc.contributor.funderMedical Research Councilen_UK
dc.citation.date29/06/2011en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Glasgowen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Glasgowen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Dundeeen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Glasgowen_UK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000293025700001en_UK
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-79959681865en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid896122en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-5873-3632en_UK
dc.date.accepted2011-06-29en_UK
dc.date.filedepositdate2019-03-05en_UK
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles

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