Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28949
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Mixed-methods evaluation of an educational intervention to change mental health nurses' attitudes to people diagnosed with borderline personality disorder
Author(s): Dickens, Geoffrey L
Lamont, Emma
Mullen, Jo
MacArthur, Nadine
Stirling, Fiona J
Contact Email: emma.lamont@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Borderline personality disorder
mental health nurses
attitudes
pre‐ post‐ survey design
qualitative research
mixed methods
Issue Date: Jul-2019
Citation: Dickens GL, Lamont E, Mullen J, MacArthur N & Stirling FJ (2019) Mixed-methods evaluation of an educational intervention to change mental health nurses' attitudes to people diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. Journal Of Clinical Nursing, 28 (13-14), pp. 2613-2623. https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.14847
Abstract: Aims and objectives To evaluate and explore mental health nurses’ responses to and experience of an educational intervention to improve attitudes towards people with a diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder. Report findings are concordant with relevant EQUATOR guidelines (STROBE and COREQ). Background Attitudes towards people with a diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder are poorer than for people with other diagnoses. There is limited evidence about what might improve this situation. One intervention with reportedly good effect uses an underlying biosocial model of borderline personality disorder. No previous intervention has been co‐produced with an expert‐by‐experience. We developed and delivered a 1‐day intervention comprising these elements. Design A mixed‐methods design was used comprising prospective within‐subjects cohort intervention and qualitative elements. Participants were mental health nursing staff working in inpatient and community settings in one NHS Board in Scotland, UK. Methods Measurement of cognitive and emotional attitudes to people with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder at pre‐ and post‐ intervention (N =28) and at 4‐month follow‐up. Focus groups were used to explore participants’ experiences of the intervention (N =11). Results Quantitative evaluation revealed some sustained changes consistent with expected attitudinal gains in relation to the perceived treatment characteristics of this group, the perception of their suicidal tendencies, and negative attitudes in general. Qualitative findings revealed some hostility towards the underpinning biosocial model and positive appreciation for the involvement of an expert‐by‐experience. Conclusions Sustained benefits of an educational intervention for people working with people diagnosed with BPD in some but not all areas. Participants provided contrasting messages about what they think will be useful. Relevance to clinical practice The study provides further evidence for incorporation of a biosocial model into staff training as well as the benefits of expert‐by‐experience co‐production. Mental health nurses, however, believe that more well‐resourced services are the key to improving care.
DOI Link: 10.1111/jocn.14847
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Dickens, GL, Lamont, E, Mullen, J, MacArthur, N, Stirling, FJ. Mixed-methods evaluation of an educational intervention to change mental health nurses' attitudes to people diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. J Clin Nurs. 2019; 28: 2613– 2623, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.14847. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

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