Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28746
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dc.contributor.authorAllmer, Thomasen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-12T01:05:06Z-
dc.date.available2019-02-12T01:05:06Z-
dc.date.issued2014-06-01en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/28746-
dc.description.abstractFirst paragraph: In recent years, based on the employment of various surveillance technologies, there has been an extension and intensification of privacy threats and surveillance risks in economic, political, and cultural contexts. The Internet and new media are among these technologies. The fact that one can find Web 2.0 platforms such as Facebook (rank 2), YouTube (rank 3), LinkedIn (rank 8) and Twitter (rank 10) among the most frequently accessed websites worldwide indicates the enormous popularity of these sites (data source: Alexa Internet, 2013). It is therefore important to conduct theoretical and empirical studies of these research areas. In Social Media as Surveillance, Daniel Trottier (2013) makes an important contribution to this task. Along with Identity Problems in the Facebook Era (Routledge), it is Trottier’s second book within the field of new and digital media to be published in almost 1 year and shows how active and energetic this scholar is. It can be expected that he will provide many new and inspiring contributions to the academic community in the near future. The book looks at the rise of surveillance practices on social media, using Facebook as a case study. Drawing on in-depth interviews with different types of users, it underscores new practices, strategies, concerns and risks that are a direct consequence of living on social media. (p. 1) The author ‘concentrates on the process by which users manage their personal information on social media, while taking advantage of the information that others put up’ (p. 1). Trottier focuses his analysis on four different social groups, namely, individuals (such as students), institutions (such as universities), economic actor (such as marketers) and political actor (such as the police). The subsequent research questions are the subject of the book: How are sites like Facebook used by these four social groups to exchange personal information? What kind of dynamics exists between these four bodies? While the first question is treated in chapters 3 to 6 by analysing the social media usage of distinct actors in the context of surveillance, the second question is answered in the concluding chapter.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen_UK
dc.relationAllmer T (2014) Social Media as Surveillance: Rethinking Visibility in a Converging World (Book Review). Review of: Social Media as Surveillance: Rethinking Visibility in a Converging World, Daniel Trottier, Social Media as Surveillance: Rethinking Visibility in a Converging World, Ashgate: Farnham and Burlington, VT, 2012; 213 pp. ISBN 978-1409438892 European Journal of Communication, 29 (3), pp. 376-379. https://doi.org/10.1177/0267323114531871b.en_UK
dc.relation.isbasedonSocial Media as Surveillance: Rethinking Visibility in a Converging World, Daniel Trottier, Social Media as Surveillance: Rethinking Visibility in a Converging World, Ashgate: Farnham and Burlington, VT, 2012; 213 pp. ISBN 978-1409438892en_UK
dc.rightsThe publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.en_UK
dc.titleSocial Media as Surveillance: Rethinking Visibility in a Converging World (Book Review)en_UK
dc.typeBook Reviewen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2999-12-31en_UK
dc.rights.embargoreason[Allmer-EJC-2014.pdf] The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository therefore there is an embargo on the full text of the work.en_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0267323114531871ben_UK
dc.citation.jtitleEuropean Journal of Communicationen_UK
dc.citation.issn1460-3705en_UK
dc.citation.issn0267-3231en_UK
dc.citation.volume29en_UK
dc.citation.issue3en_UK
dc.citation.spage376en_UK
dc.citation.epage379en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedUnrefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusVoR - Version of Recorden_UK
dc.contributor.funderUniversity of Edinburghen_UK
dc.author.emailthomas.allmer@stir.ac.uken_UK
dc.citation.date20/05/2014en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUnified Theory of Information Research Groupen_UK
dc.identifier.isi000336788800009en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid1075729en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0001-5252-4314en_UK
dc.date.firstcompliantdepositdate2019-02-01en_UK
Appears in Collections:Communications, Media and Culture Book Reviews

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