Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28570
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Attitudes to E-Cigarettes and Cessation Support for Pregnant Women from English Stop Smoking Services: A Mixed Methods Study
Author(s): Cooper, Sue
Orton, Sophie
Campbell, Katarzyna
Ussher, Michael
Coleman-Haynes, Naomi
Whitemore, Rachel
Dickinson, Anne
McEwen, Andy
Lewis, Sarah
Naughton, Felix
Bowker, Katharine
Sinclair, Lesley
Bauld, Linda
Coleman, Tim
Keywords: smoking cessation
smoking
pregnancy
e-cigarettes
electronic cigarettes
stop smoking services
survey
interviews
mixed methods
Issue Date: 31-Jan-2019
Citation: Cooper S, Orton S, Campbell K, Ussher M, Coleman-Haynes N, Whitemore R, Dickinson A, McEwen A, Lewis S, Naughton F, Bowker K, Sinclair L, Bauld L & Coleman T (2019) Attitudes to E-Cigarettes and Cessation Support for Pregnant Women from English Stop Smoking Services: A Mixed Methods Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16 (1), Art. No.: 110. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16010110
Abstract: Smoking in pregnancy remains a public health problem. In the UK e-cigarettes are the most popular aid to quitting smoking outside of pregnancy, but we don’t know the extent of e-cigarette use in pregnancy or how English Stop Smoking Services (SSS) respond to pregnant women who vape. In 2015 we surveyed SSS managers about cessation support for pregnant women and responses to clients who vaped. Subsequently we interviewed a sub-sample of managers to seek explanations for the SSS’ position on e-cigarettes; interviews were thematically analysed. Survey response rate was 67.8% (72/106); overall managers reported 2.2% (range 1.4–4.3%) of pregnant clients were using e-cigarettes. Most SSS reported supporting pregnant women who already vaped, but would not recommend e-cigarette use; for women that were still smoking and not using e-cigarettes, 8.3% of SSS were likely/very likely to advise using e-cigarettes, with 56.9% of SSS unlikely/very unlikely to advise using them. Fifteen respondents were interviewed; interviewees were generally positive about the potential of e-cigarettes for cessation in pregnancy although concerns about perceived lack of evidence for safety were expressed and most wanted research on this. Clear guidance on e-cigarette use informed by pregnancy specific research will assist SSS to provide consistent evidence-based support.
DOI Link: 10.3390/ijerph16010110
Rights: This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

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