Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28544
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Newspaper/Magazine Articles
Title: VO₂max: the gold standard for measuring fitness explained
Author(s): Metcalfe, Richard
McNarry, Melitta
Vollaard, Niels
Keywords: exercise
fitness
health
Issue Date: 15-Jan-2019
Publisher: The Conversation Trust
Citation: Metcalfe R, McNarry M & Vollaard N (2019) VO₂max: the gold standard for measuring fitness explained. The Conversation. 15.01.2019. https://theconversation.com/vo-max-the-gold-standard-for-measuring-fitness-explained-109486
Abstract: First paragraph: If you could pick one measure to evaluate your health, what would you pick? Blood pressure? Cholesterol? These are commonly measured by your GP, but there is something that is more informative: maximal aerobic capacity, otherwise known as VO₂max. This measure tells you your maximum (max) rate (V) of oxygen (O₂) uptake and use during exercise. The greater this is, the better your health. In fact, VO₂max is the best predictor of your risk, at a given point in time, of getting chronic diseases like heart disease, type 2 diabetes or certain cancers, and the best predictor of your chances of living a long and healthy life. Intuitively, this does not make much sense: most people go through life without ever needing to reach their VO₂max.
Type: Newspaper/Magazine Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28544
Rights: The Conversation uses a Creative Commons Attribution NoDerivatives licence. You can republish their articles for free, online or in print. Licence information is available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/
Affiliation: Sport

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