Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28519
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Emotional labour in social workers' encounters with children and their families (Forthcoming/Available Online)
Author(s): Winter, Karen
Morrison, Fiona
Cree, Viviene
Ruch, Gillian
Hadfield, Mark
Hallett, Sophie
Contact Email: f.morrison@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Emotional labour
Hochschild
social work
encounters
children
families
Issue Date: 18-Apr-2018
Citation: Winter K, Morrison F, Cree V, Ruch G, Hadfield M & Hallett S (2018) Emotional labour in social workers' encounters with children and their families (Forthcoming/Available Online). British Journal of Social Work. https://doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcy016.
Abstract: The ways in which social workers experience a range of emotions that are evoked in their professional relationships with children and families is an area that is little focused upon and yet the processes involved in their expression and management can have profound implications for all involved. Theoretically informed by sociological concepts and combining data from a two-year, UK four-nation, ESRC-funded research project, ‘Talking and Listening to Children’ (TLC), this paper explores the ways in which social work organisational contexts and dynamics give rise to ‘feeling rules’ in the workplace and the impact of these on social workers’ relationships with children and families. Using Hochschild’s (1983) emotional labour analytical framework, the paper highlights that the management and expression of social workers’ feelings are filtered through personal, professional and organisational contexts. The implications of these pervasive and powerful processes are explored. The paper concludes by considering the significant, wide-reaching implications of this focus on the experience, expression and management of emotion for everyday social work practice in both children and families settings specifically and other social work practice contexts more broadly.
DOI Link: 10.1093/bjsw/bcy016
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