Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28081
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport eTheses
Title: The Impact of Leadership on the Delivery of High Quality Patient Centred Care in Allied Health Professional Practice
Author(s): Liddle, Keir
Supervisor(s): Duncan, Edward
Keywords: Allied Health Professions
leadership
management
transformational leadership
emotional intelligence
flexibility in responsiveness
Issue Date: 6-Apr-2018
Publisher: University of Stirling
Abstract: The Healthcare Quality Strategy for NHS Scotland, relates its overall vision of healthcare quality to six dimensions of care as: Safe, Efficient, Effective, Equitable, Timely and Patient Centred. Patient Centred Care also underpins many subsequent policies such as the management of Long Term Conditions (Scottish Government, 2008) and the Chief Medical Officers Realistic Medicine report (Barlow, et al., 2015) Leadership styles and associated policies and procedures are often assumed to inhibit or encourage the delivery of quality Patient Centred Care and the NHS invests millions of pounds per year in Leadership training. At a clinical team and management level there are behaviours and initiatives that can arguably have positive and negative impacts on the ability of individual practitioners to provide quality Patient Centred Care. However there have been no attempts to empirically test the association between (good) Leadership and quality Patient Centred Care. Without any evidence of such a relationship, NHS investment of substantial resources may be misguided. Additionally, much of the focus of research in both Leadership and Patient Centred Care has focused on medical practitioners and nurses. There is little research that focuses on the impact of allied health professionals' (a term describing 12 differing health care professional groups representing over 130,000 clinicians throughout the United Kingdom) practice on the quality of person centred care and how this is affected by Leadership structures and styles. This study aimed to explore whether there is a direct or indirect link between (transformational) Leadership and achieving the delivery of high quality Patient Centred Care (PCC) in allied health professional (AHP) practice. Aim The aim of this thesis was to explore whether it was possible to empirically demonstrate a relationship between Leadership (good or bad) and Patient Centred Care, and to do this in relation to Allied Health Professional practice. Research questions I. Is there a relationship between Transformational Leadership and Patient Centred Care in AHP practice? II. How do AHP’s conceptualise Leadership and its impact on their ability to deliver PCC? III. Do local contexts influence the ability of leaders to support Patient Centred Care? Study one Study one was designed to answer research question one: exploring the relationship between transformational Leadership and Patient Centred Care using survey design. Two groups of Allied Health Professionals were selected to take part in the study: Podiatrists and Dieticians. Clinical team leaders from across 12 Podiatry teams and 12 Dietetic teams completed a survey composed of measures of transformational Leadership and self-monitoring. Clinicians from these teams were also be asked to complete questionnaires on their perception of their clinical leaders’ transformational Leadership skills. This allowed comparison of self-assessed Leadership and team assessed Leadership. Clinicians were also asked to collect patient experience measures from 30 of their patients. Study Two Study Two was designed to answer research questions 2 and 3: how do AHPs conceptualise Leadership and how do they view the link between Leadership and their ability to deliver Patient Centred Care; and how might local context impact on professional Leadership and therefore its potential to enable or inhibit Patient Centred Care. In depth interviews were conducted with clinicians and clinical team leaders to explore the barriers and facilitators to effective Leadership, teamwork and the provision of quality care. Interviews were conducted with 21 Podiatrists and 12 Dieticians and analysed using a framework analysis approach. Results I. Is there a relationship between Patient Centred Care and transformational Leadership in AHP practice? The theory that there is a link between transformational Leadership and Patient Centred Care was confirmed. A significant relationship was discovered for the dietetics group linking Transformational Leadership with patient centred quality of care measures. There was also a relationship in the podiatry group that was suggestive of a relationship. II. How do AHP’s conceptualise Leadership and its impact on their ability to deliver PCC? AHP’s in both groups had broadly similar conceptualisations of Leadership and both groups played down the role of Leadership in the delivery of Patient Centred Care. A far more salient factor in achieving the delivery of high quality Patient Centred Care for the AHP’s interviewed was professional autonomy. III. Do local contexts influence the ability of leaders to support Patient Centred Care? A number of contextual issues related to both Patient Centred Care and Leadership were identified from the qualitative analysis. These were centred on systemic factors, relating to management and bureaucracy, and individual factors, such as relationships within teams. In Podiatry a major shift in the context of care was ongoing during the study, namely a greater emphasis on encouraging patients to self-care. This affected the relationships between patients and Podiatrists, and Podiatrists and managers, in a way that Podiatrists felt it negatively impacted on their ability to provide quality Patient Centred Care. Conclusion A weak relationship was observed between Transformational Leadership styles and the delivery of Patient Centred Care in two Allied Health Professional groups. Professional autonomy was identified as being more likely to facilitate delivery of person centred care. Organisational issues and intervening policy directives can impact on the delivery of Patient Centred Care, regardless of Leadership. Recommendations Further work exploring the link between Leadership and Patient Centred Care is required. The concept of professional autonomy should be fostered within Leadership programs to enhance delivery of Patient Centred Care. The impact of individual policies, such as moves towards more self-care, on quality criteria need to be more fully considered. Whilst such policies may make care more efficient, there may be negative consequences for other quality care criteria, such as Patient Centred Care.  
Type: Thesis or Dissertation
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28081
Affiliation: Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport

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