Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/28032
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Factors and motivations contributing to community volunteers' participation in a nursery feeding project in Malawi
Author(s): Uny, Isabelle
Contact Email: isabelle.uny@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Social Sector
Civil Society
Aid
Sub-Saharan Africa
Issue Date: 30-Jun-2008
Citation: Uny I (2008) Factors and motivations contributing to community volunteers' participation in a nursery feeding project in Malawi. Development in Practice, 18 (3), pp. 437-445. https://doi.org/10.1080/09614520802030649.
Abstract: This article reports on a study to explore the factors and motivations that contribute to community volunteers' participation in a nursery feeding project in Malawi. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with community volunteers in 14 of the 32 sites in the programme. The findings pointed to a mix of intrinsic motivations, namely a deep concern for orphans and vulnerable children, a moral obligation to help, and a declared love of the work undertaken, and also to external factors such as spirituality, links of reciprocity, and the building of social capital. Understanding what motivates volunteers to take part in resource-poor settings is crucial to recognising, facilitating, and sustaining the work that they do. Further research into volunteering in the South is crucially needed.
DOI Link: 10.1080/09614520802030649
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