Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/27786
Appears in Collections:History and Politics Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Formulation, stabilisation and encapsulation of bacteriophage for phage therapy
Author(s): Malik, Danish J
Sokolov, Ilya J
Vinner, Gurinder K
Mancuso, Francesco
Cinquerrui, Salvatore
Vladisavljevic, Goran T
Clokie, Martha R J
Garton, Natalie J
Stapley, Andrew G F
Kirpichnikova, Anna
Keywords: Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
Colloid and Surface Chemistry
Surfaces and Interfaces
Issue Date: 30-Nov-2017
Citation: Malik DJ, Sokolov IJ, Vinner GK, Mancuso F, Cinquerrui S, Vladisavljevic GT, Clokie MRJ, Garton NJ, Stapley AGF & Kirpichnikova A (2017) Formulation, stabilisation and encapsulation of bacteriophage for phage therapy. Advances in Colloid and Interface Science, 249, pp. 100-133. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cis.2017.05.014
Abstract: Against a backdrop of global antibiotic resistance and increasing awareness of the importance of the human microbiota, there has been resurgent interest in the potential use of bacteriophages for therapeutic purposes, known as phage therapy. A number of phage therapy phase I and II clinical trials have concluded, and shown phages don't present significant adverse safety concerns. These clinical trials used simple phage suspensions without any formulation and phage stability was of secondary concern. Phages have a limited stability in solution, and undergo a significant drop in phage titre during processing and storage which is unacceptable if phages are to become regulated pharmaceuticals, where stable dosage and well defined pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are de rigueur. Animal studies have shown that the efficacy of phage therapy outcomes depend on the phage concentration (i.e. the dose) delivered at the site of infection, and their ability to target and kill bacteria, arresting bacterial growth and clearing the infection. In addition, in vitro and animal studies have shown the importance of using phage cocktails rather than single phage preparations to achieve better therapy outcomes. The in vivo reduction of phage concentration due to interactions with host antibodies or other clearance mechanisms may necessitate repeated dosing of phages, or sustained release approaches. Modelling of phage-bacterium population dynamics reinforces these points. Surprisingly little attention has been devoted to the effect of formulation on phage therapy outcomes, given the need for phage cocktails, where each phage within a cocktail may require significantly different formulation to retain a high enough infective dose.
DOI Link: 10.1016/j.cis.2017.05.014
Rights: © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY/4.0/).
Licence URL(s): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
1-s2.0-S000186861630392X-main.pdfFulltext - Published Version1.59 MBAdobe PDFView/Open



This item is protected by original copyright



A file in this item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons

Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.