Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/27255
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The role of health behaviours across the life course in the socioeconomic patterning of all-cause mortality: The west of Scotland twenty-07 prospective cohort study
Author(s): Whitley, Elise
Batty, G David
Hunt, Kathryn
Popham, Frank
Benzeval, Michaela
Keywords: Mortality
socioeconomic status
health behaviours
cohort
Issue Date: Apr-2014
Citation: Whitley E, Batty GD, Hunt K, Popham F & Benzeval M (2014) The role of health behaviours across the life course in the socioeconomic patterning of all-cause mortality: The west of Scotland twenty-07 prospective cohort study, Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 47 (2), pp. 148-157.
Abstract: Background: Socioeconomic differentials in mortality are increasing in many industrialised countries.  Purpose: This study aims to examine the role of behaviours (smoking, alcohol, exercise, and diet) in explaining socioeconomic differentials in mortality and whether this varies over the life course, between cohorts and by gender.  Methods: Analysis of two representative population cohorts of men and women, born in the 1950s and 1930s, were performed. Health behaviours were assessed on five occasions over 20 years.  Results: Health behaviours explained a substantial part of the socioeconomic differentials in mortality. Cumulative behaviours and those that were more strongly associated with socioeconomic status had the greatest impact. For example, in the 1950s cohort, the age-sex adjusted hazard ratio comparing respondents with manual versus non-manual occupational status was 1.80 (1.25, 2.58); adjustment for cumulative smoking over 20 years attenuated the association by 49 %, diet by 43 %, drinking by 13 % and inactivity by only 1%.  Conclusions: Health behaviours have an important role in explaining socioeconomic differentials in mortality. © 2013 The Author(s).
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12160-013-9539-x
Rights: Copyright © 2013, The Author(s) This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/), which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are credited.

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