Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/27195
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Factors affecting continuation of clean intermittent catheterisation in people with multiple sclerosis: Results of the COSMOS mixed-methods study (Forthcoming/Available Online)
Author(s): McClurg, Doreen
Bugge, Carol
Elders, Andrew
Irshad, Tasneem
Hagen, Suzanne
Moore, Katherine
Buckley, Brian
Fader, Mandy
Keywords: Quality of life
rehabilitation
symptomatic treatment
CIC
Issue Date: 23-Apr-2018
Citation: McClurg D, Bugge C, Elders A, Irshad T, Hagen S, Moore K, Buckley B & Fader M (2018) Factors affecting continuation of clean intermittent catheterisation in people with multiple sclerosis: Results of the COSMOS mixed-methods study (Forthcoming/Available Online), Multiple Sclerosis Journal.
Abstract: Background:  Clean intermittent catheterisation (CIC) is often recommended for people with multiple sclerosis (MS).  Objective:  To determine the variables that affect continuation or discontinuation of the use of CIC.  Methods:  A three-part mixed-method study (prospective longitudinal cohort (n = 56), longitudinal qualitative interviews (n = 20) and retrospective survey (n = 456)) was undertaken, which identified the variables that influenced CIC continuation/discontinuation. The potential explanatory variables investigated in each study were the individual’s age, gender, social circumstances, number of urinary tract infections, bladder symptoms, presence of co-morbidity, stage of multiple sclerosis and years since diagnosis, as well as CIC teaching method and intensity.  Results:  For some people with MS the prospect of undertaking CIC is difficult and may take a period of time to accept before beginning the process of using CIC. Ongoing support from clinicians, support at home and a perceived improvement in symptoms such as nocturia were positive predictors of continuation. In many cases, the development of a urinary tract infection during the early stages of CIC use had a significant detrimental impact on continuation.  Conclusion:  Procedures for reducing the incidence of urinary tract infection during the learning period (i.e. when being taught and becoming competent) should be considered, as well as the development of a tool to aid identification of a person’s readiness to try CIC.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1352458518768722
Rights: McClurg D, Bugge C, Elders A, Irshad T, Hagen S, Moore K, Buckley B & Fader M (2018) Factors affecting continuation of clean intermittent catheterisation in people with multiple sclerosis: Results of the COSMOS mixed-methods study, Multiple Sclerosis Journal (Forthcoming). Copyright © Authors 2018. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications.

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