Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/27095
Appears in Collections:Aquaculture Newspaper/Magazine Articles
Title: Let them eat carp: Fish farms are helping to fight hunger
Author(s): Belton, Ben
Little, David Colin
Bush, Simon R
Issue Date: 8-Mar-2018
Citation: Belton B, Little DC & Bush SR (2018) Let them eat carp: Fish farms are helping to fight hunger, The Conversation, 08.03.2018.
Abstract: First paragraph: Over the past three decades, the global aquaculture industry has risen from obscurity to become a critical source of food for millions of people. In 1990, only 13 percent of world seafood consumption was farmed; by 2014, aquaculture was providing more than half of the fish consumed directly by human beings.  The boom has made farmed fish like shrimp, tilapia and pangasius catfish – imported from countries such as Thailand, China and Vietnam – an increasingly common sight in European and North American supermarkets. As a result, much research on aquaculture has emphasized production for export.  This focus has led scholars to question whether aquaculture contributes to the food security of poorer people in producing countries. Many have concluded it does not. Meanwhile, the industry’s advocates often emphasize the potential for small-scale farms, mainly growing fish for home consumption, to feed the poor. Farms of this kind are sometimes claimed to account for 70 to 80 percent of global aquaculture production.
URL: https://theconversation.com/let-them-eat-carp-fish-farms-are-helping-to-fight-hunger-90421
Rights: The Conversation uses a Creative Commons Attribution NoDerivatives licence. You can republish their articles for free, online or in print. Licence information is available at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/4.0/

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