Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/27066
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Adolescent socio-economic and school-based social status, health and well-being
Author(s): Sweeting, Helen
Hunt, Kathryn
Keywords: Adolescent
Subjective social status
Socio-economic status
School-based social status
Peer status
Health
Psychological well-being
United Kingdom
Issue Date: Nov-2014
Citation: Sweeting H & Hunt K (2014) Adolescent socio-economic and school-based social status, health and well-being, Social Science and Medicine, 121, pp. 39-47.
Abstract: Studies of adults and adolescents suggest subjective socio-economic status (SES) is associated with health/well-being even after adjustment for objective SES. In adolescence, objective SES may have weaker relationships with health/well-being than at other life stages; school-based social status may be of greater relevance. We investigated the associations which objective SES (residential deprivation and family affluence), subjective SES and three school-based subjective social status dimensions ("SSS-peer", "SSS-scholastic" and "SSS-sports") had with physical symptoms, psychological distress and anger among 2503 Scottish 13-15 year-olds. Associations between objective SES and health/well-being were weak and inconsistent. Lower subjective SES was associated with increased physical symptoms and psychological distress, lower SSS-peer with increased psychological distress but reduced anger, lower SSS-scholastic with increased physical symptoms, psychological distress and anger, and lower SSS-sports with increased physical symptoms and psychological distress. Associations did not differ by gender. Objective and subjective SES had weaker associations with health/well-being than did school-based SSS dimensions. These findings underline the importance of school-based SSS in adolescence, and the need for future studies to include a range of school-based SSS dimensions and several health/well-being measures. They also highlight the need for a focus on school-based social status among those working to promote adolescent health/well-being.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.09.037
Rights: © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

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