Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/27015
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Classroom carbon dioxide concentration, school attendance, and educational attainment
Author(s): Gaihre, Santosh
Semple, Sean
Miller, Janice
Fielding, Shona
Turner, Steve
Contact Email: sean.semple@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Academic performance
carbon dioxide
indoor air quality
schools
school absence
temperature
Issue Date: Sep-2014
Citation: Gaihre S, Semple S, Miller J, Fielding S & Turner S (2014) Classroom carbon dioxide concentration, school attendance, and educational attainment, Journal of School Health, 84 (9), pp. 569-574.
Abstract: Background: We tested the hypothesis that classroom carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration is inversely related to child school attendance and educational attainment.  Methods: Concentrations of CO2 were measured over a 3-5day period in 60 naturally ventilated classrooms of primary school children in Scotland. Concentrations of CO2 were related to the class average annual attendance and proportions attaining a national standard for reading, writing, and numeracy, adjusted for socioeconomic status and class size.  Results: The median (interquartile range, IQR) CO2 concentration averaged over the school day was 1086ppm (922, 1310). In the model, Time Weighted Average CO2 concentrations were inversely associated with school attendance but not academic attainments. An increase of 100ppm CO2 was associated with a reduced annual attendance of 0.2% (0.04, 0.4) roughly equivalent to 1 half day of school per annum, assuming schools are open on 190days per year. Indoor temperature and relative humidity were not related to attendance or academic attainment.  Conclusions: Inadequate classroom ventilation, as evidenced by CO2 concentration exceeding 1000ppm, is not uncommon and may be associated with reduced school attendance. A relationship between inadequate classroom ventilation and adverse health outcomes in children may be present and this needs to be explored.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12183
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Gaihre_et_al-2014-Journal_of_School_Health.pdf509.12 kBAdobe PDFUnder Permanent Embargo    Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependent on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.



This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.